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I'm having a segmentation fault when I want to save a string in a dynamic array.

I have a program that does this:

User insert char "s"
The program enters a loop and save strings in an array (name: cod).
When user inserts char "t", it stops

After that I save that array in the first position of a new dynamic array (name: vec).

Then if user insert char "s" again
The program enters a loop and save strings in an array.
When user inserts char "t", it stops

After that I save that array in the second position of a new dynamic array.

and so one.


This is my code:

int main(){

char Cod[30][11];
char tmp[11];
char ***vec;
int i = 0;


strcpy (tmp, "p");

vec = (char *** ) malloc (sizeof ( char *) );
vec[0] = (char ** ) malloc (sizeof ( char *) * 30);


do {

    scanf("%s", tmp);

    while( (strcmp (tmp, "p")) != 0){

        strcpy ( Cod[i] , tmp ); 

        scanf("%s", tmp);

        i++;
    }

    vec = (char ***) realloc (vec, sizeof ( char *) * (i + 1));
    vec[i + 1] = (char ** ) realloc (vec[i + 1], sizeof ( char *) * (30));
    vec[i-1] = (char **) Cod;
    scanf("%s", tmp);

}

while((strcmp (tmp, "s")) == 0);

    printf("%s", vec[0][0]);

return 0;

}

This is the part of the code that work's:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>


int main(){

    char Cod[30][11];
    char tmp[11];
    int i = 0;


    strcpy (tmp, "p");


    do {

        scanf("%s", tmp);

        while( (strcmp (tmp, "p")) != 0){

            strcpy ( Cod[i] , tmp ); 

            scanf("%s", tmp);

            i++;
        }

        scanf("%s", tmp);

    }

    while((strcmp (tmp, "s")) == 0);

        printf("%s", Cod[0]);

return 0;

}
share|improve this question
    
Try valgrind. –  pmg Dec 7 '11 at 12:04
    
Could you please provide complete, working code and a file with user inputs that can be piped to the program in order to reproduce the observed behavior? –  moooeeeep Dec 7 '11 at 12:59
    
done. This is all the code. If you comment all the malloc's and realloc's is working fine: –  gn66 Dec 7 '11 at 13:08
    
I posted the part of the code that works –  gn66 Dec 7 '11 at 13:14

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Since it is a homework I tried to rewrite your code in something that should work...

char Cod[30][11];
char tmp[11];
char ***vec;
int i = 0;


strcpy (tmp, "p");
vec = (char***)malloc(sizeof(char *));
vec[0] = (char**)malloc(sizeof(Cod));


do {
    scanf("%s", tmp);        
    int j = 0;
    while(strcmp(tmp, "p")) {
        strcpy(Cod[j], tmp);
        scanf("%s", tmp);
        j++;
    }
    vec = (char ***)realloc(vec, sizeof(char *) * (i+1));
    vec[i] = (char **)malloc(sizeof(Cod));
    memcpy(vec[i], Cod, sizeof(Cod));//you need to copy results since next time the Cod will be rewritten
    scanf("%s", tmp);
    i++;
} while((strcmp(tmp, "s")) == 0);
share|improve this answer
    
It solved the problem of segmentation fault thanks, and now how can I access the vec[0][0]? When I try It prints: null –  gn66 Dec 7 '11 at 14:47

I started to fix this code but soon realized there is so much wrong in it, I don't know where to start. So instead, this turned out to be a code review answer instead, I apologize up front if it is detailed and picky.

  • There's a rule of thumb in C saying that if you need more than two levels of pointer indirection, your code is obfuscated and should be rewritten (reference MISRA-C:2004 17.5).

  • It doesn't make sense whatsoever to use dynamic memory allocation in this case, because you already know at program start-up that no string will be larger than 11 characters and there will not be more than 30 strings. If this condition is not true, you need to write a safer input method, preferably with fgets() which is safe against buffer overflows. Make sure that the input doesn't go out of bounds of array "Cod". You can allocate 30*11=330 bytes statically without a guilty conscience. And it will make the code faster.

  • It doesn't make sense to have 3 levels of indirection for an array of strings. You aren't even using the dynamic memory to hold a copy of strings, you just allocate pointers. This doesn't make any sense at all. If you need a pointer lookup table pointing at Cod then allocate it statically, it will only require sizeof(char*)*30 bytes.

  • As already mentioned, you can only use realloc on a pointer that has previously been malloc/calloc:ed.

  • As already mentioned, never typecast the result of malloc/realloc in C. This is C++ practice. In C, it destroys type safety and hides type compatibility bugs. There are countless, detailed discussions about this here on SO if you want to know the details.

  • What if you don't find "p" in the user string? The program will go havoc.

  • Don't name variables that affect fundamental program functionality to abstract things like tmp, vec etc. tmp could be renamed to input_buf or something, etc.

  • Avoid magic numbers in code, use const or #define for array length constants.

  • You can initialize strings in C, there is no need for strcpy to do so. char input_buf[INP_BUF_N] = "p";

  • To search for a char in a string, use strchr().

  • You shouldn't need to have the user inputting the same thing twice with scanf() in the outer do-while loop, likely a typo bug.

  • You can not do wild typecast between a static array of arrays to a pointer-to-pointer. This depends on the structure of whatever the pointer-to-pointer points at. Because a typical dumb-school-book dynamic 2D-array (malloc(X*sizeof(char*)... malloc(Y*sizeof(char)) will not allocate memory adjacently. Plenty of discussions about this here on SO.

(you can allocate dynamic 2D arrays in adjacent memory with the use of array pointers or with "mangling", but those are rather advanced topics)

  • free() the dynamic memory once you are done using it.

As you hopefully can tell, the wise choice here is to rewrite this code from scratch.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 ... MISRA 17.5, apparently, is an advisory rule; not a "rule of thumb" ;) –  pmg Dec 7 '11 at 13:01
    
Thanks for the reply and for the advice. Well I really have to make dynamic because I have a limit of 30 strings in the array (cod) but I don't know many "30 strings limit" I will have. I need to save a string with limit of 11 chars in an array with limit 30. Than I need to save that array in the first position of a new one... and so one.... <br> <br> The do while cycle is working, I already tested it. The error is in the allocation of memory. The cod array is working also, the problem is the dynamic array (vec). –  gn66 Dec 7 '11 at 13:03
    
@pmg Yes I know, I merely wanted to cite an authority so that people don't think these are just my own personal opinions. –  Lundin Dec 8 '11 at 10:02
    
@gn66 In that case your program is completely off, it does nothing of the sort. My advise is to put the whole "cod" thing in a struct, then allocate a one-dimensional array of that struct. Then you won't have to use any strange pointer lookup tables at all, just array indexing. Your program may appear to be working, but there are just too many fundamental flaws for this code to get turned into something stable and maintainable. –  Lundin Dec 8 '11 at 10:06
    
@Lundin Yes, is one good solution. Thanks for the advice! –  gn66 Dec 8 '11 at 17:46

for three stars

char ***vec;

you need 3 mallocs (the casts are, at best, redundant in C and may hide an error)

vec = malloc(sizeof *vec);
vec[0] = malloc(sizeof *vec[0]);
vec[0][0] = malloc(30 * sizeof *vec[0][0]); /* sizeof (char) is 1 by definition */
share|improve this answer
    
But he doesn't uses vec[i] just assigns to it. –  Beginner Dec 7 '11 at 12:08
    
If he doesn't use it, the best course of action is to remove it altogether: this makes the code so much easier to debug (and more performant) :) –  pmg Dec 7 '11 at 12:10
    
thanks for the reply, I apply your changes and still have a segmentation fault. I don't understand why I should allocate the last because I think the it is done automatically when I initialize Cod[30][11]. Can I use only two stars? My first implementation was with two stars but I read that when I have a a pointer for a pointer for a pointer of char's I should have tree... –  gn66 Dec 7 '11 at 12:16
    
Sorry, I forgot to mention I do a printf: printf("%s %s", "STAGE_1:", vec[0][0]); –  gn66 Dec 7 '11 at 12:21
    
Can you write a version of your code without dynamic memory? Using simple arrays for vec? How many dimensions would you need? vec[100][30] or vec[100][100][30]? The number of dimensions in the array version should be the same number of stars (and mallocs) in the dynamic memory version. –  pmg Dec 7 '11 at 12:31

In this 2 lines:

vec = (char ***) realloc (vec, sizeof ( char *) * (i + 1));
vec[i + 1] = (char ** ) realloc (vec[i + 1], sizeof ( char *) * (30));

If i = 1, then you reserve to "vec" i+1=2 pointers. In the second line you then call the 3rd one (vec[i+1] = vec[2] is 3rd element in table of size 2).

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the reply, I fixed that. but still have a segmentation fault.... :S So i comment the realloc's and I tried inserting only one element and making the printf of that element and still a segmentation fault. So I probably have another error in the malloc... –  gn66 Dec 7 '11 at 12:35
    
Well, this code is hardly readable.. Id guess the second line still has a VREY huge problem, but could be solved by using malloc instead of realloc. This might be a bit easier if we knew what is your goal. Getting an array of arrays of strings got from console? –  Matic Oblak Dec 7 '11 at 12:42
    
No, my goal is to manipulate information of library for statistics. So the librarian inputs in the computer all users and the book they took. So the books between "s" and "p" are from one user, then she inserts again another books from "s" and "p".... ans so one. –  gn66 Dec 7 '11 at 12:53
    
i posted the part of the code that works –  gn66 Dec 7 '11 at 13:15

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