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I am trying to make a web chat to integrate with other languages. I am willing to create my own webserver in java.. that knows only to respond to a specific request.

I have a socket that is listening to port 80. answering with

out.print("HTTP/1.1 200 OK\r\n");
out.print("Content-Type: text/plain\r\n\r\n");

out.println("We have a text now");

out.print("\r\n");
out.print("\r\n");
out.print("0");
out.print("\r\n");
out.print("\r\n");

My problem is... is there any way to use partial response to keep the browser's socket open?

I want to send the messages only when they exist.. in this case messages will be sent almost instantly..

P.S: I am not talking about web-sockets because not all programs support web-sockets... only browsers do... (programs that don't support web-sockets: Internet Explorer)

My question is if I can use partial response (206) in this case.. and how to keep the page "loading" and also send partial text... ??... Do I have to say content-length or something? what header do I have to write... I know only for several statuses (200, 301, 404, etc). For 206 I don't know what to write on first, second, third line.. how to send the response (as xml, text, or can I define content type?) and how to read it from javascript?

For example I want this code to write every second something:

out.print("HTTP/1.1 200 OK\r\n");
out.print("Content-Type: text/plain\r\n\r\n");

for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++)
{
    out.println("We have a text now");
    try
    {
        Thread.sleep(1000);
    }
    catch (InterruptedException e)
    {
        e.printStackTrace();
    }

}

out.print("\r\n");
out.print("\r\n");
out.print("0");
out.print("\r\n");
out.print("\r\n");

Regards

share|improve this question
    
keep the browser's socket open? Why you want this ? – PeterMmm Dec 7 '11 at 13:03
    
because I want to send the messages only when they exist.. so.. like this the messages are send almost instantly.. – Alex Dec 7 '11 at 13:05
    
not understand your question – Kit Ho Dec 7 '11 at 13:06
    
if I can use partial response.. and what partial response can offer me... – Alex Dec 7 '11 at 13:07
    
I am willing to create my own webserver in java..There are a lot of them available including with advanced chat examples like that irc.codehaus.org/display/JETTY/Continuations – PeterMmm Dec 7 '11 at 13:11
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Any decent http client will use http keep-alives, so if a user makes a request again within a few seconds they will not need to open a new connection. If you write your own web-server you will have to make sure to implement this or the implementation will be slower than a standard web server or web container (e.g. tomcat or jetty). Also, since many languages have good http libraries, you don't need a custom implementation of a web server for this either.

If you've written a servlet, it is possible to simply never return from the http response and then just write responses out as they come. This will tie up threads on the server though and probably won't scale very well.

You could try one of the asynchronous http implementations (e.g. netty or mina) and have a go at it, but that is significantly more work -- although it would still be far less work than trying to roll your own.

share|improve this answer

This code "keeps the browser's socket open":

out.print("Connection:keep-alive \r\n");

But remember that the browser might still need polling to get new text.

share|improve this answer
    
this is not helping me... I want to get the text as I write it.. I will update my post... – Alex Dec 7 '11 at 13:25

Don't mind with keep-alive or other headers. Simply wait a reasonable amount in your web service, performing change checks and sleep()s.

I use 10..20 sec sleep in my PHP code, and it works. (PHP's default script max. execution time is 30 sec., so it needs no Apache/PHP config.) Also I use 4..5 sec sleep in my C/C++ server code, just "because I can", my simple C++ webserver response thread eats far less resources than a PHP web server thread/process (whatever).

There is only one problem in this pattern: when a change occurs on server side, you should not response immediatelly, because it's possible than there are more than 1 change occurred, so you should wait and collect some changes in order to report them in one answer.

share|improve this answer

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