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private final ExecutorService executorParsers = Executors.newFixedThreadPool(10);

public void parse(List<MyObjInt> objs) {
   //... bunch of elided stuff ....

   CompletionService<AsupParseObj> parserService = new ExecutorCompletionService<AsupParseObj>(executorParsers);

   for (final AsupStoreObj obj : objs) {
      parserService.submit(new ParseThread(obj));
   }
}

I would like to DI the "ParseThread" but surely there has to be a better way to do this than burying a call to getBean on a prototype scoped bean and as I am new to Spring I figured I would ask...

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With Spring DI, you need to make your object more like a POJO. So given that, there is are a few ways I can sort of envision where you can go with your code. Can you provide a larger snippet and some additional context for what you are trying to do? –  Chris J Dec 7 '11 at 14:18
1  
looks like your ParseThread does not have any other dependency other than the AsupStoreObject ... in this case ... what do you want spring to help? –  Dapeng Dec 7 '11 at 14:20
1  
Well my intention was to be able to inject the ParseThread callables so that I can more easily switch out / mock those instead of being tied as this code is to a specific implementation of ParseThread –  user1085751 Dec 7 '11 at 14:38

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Here is the full configuration using lookup-method (see 3.4.6.1 Lookup method injection):

<bean id="executorParsers" class="java.util.concurrent.Executors" 
        factory-method="newFixedThreadPool" 
        destroy-method="shutdownNow">
    <constructor-arg value="10"/>
</bean>

<bean id="parserService" class="java.util.concurrent.CompletionService">
    <constructor-arg ref="executorParsers"/>
</bean>

<bean id="foo" class="Foo">
    <lookup-method name="createThread" bean="parseThread"/>
</bean>

<bean id="parseThread" class="ParseThread" scope="prototype" lazy-init="true"/>

And the Java code:

abstract class Foo {

    @Autowired
    CompletionService parserService;

    protected abstract ParseThread createThread();

    public void parse(List<MyObjInt> objs) {
        for (final AsupStoreObj obj : objs) {
            ParseThread t = createThread();
            t.setObject(obj);
            parserService.submit(t);
        }
    }
}

Unfortunately you cannot pass any parameters to lookup-method (see SPR-7431 and my article Creating prototype Spring beans on demand using lookup-method), hence the need for artificial setObject().

If you don't like abstract methods/classes, lookup method can be non-abstract no-op method or (better) the default implementation can throw an exception. Spring will override the implementation at runtime, effectively calling getBean() for you.

Bonus: I translated Executor/CompletionService to Spring managed beans as well. Note that Spring supports these out-of-the-box: Task Execution and Scheduling.

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For the Spring version 3.0.5 I had to change java.util.concurrent.CompletionService to java.util.concurrent.ExecutorCompletionService because CompletionService is an interface, so the instantiation could not succeed due to the ambiguity. –  Alex Fedulov Dec 16 '13 at 21:32

Well, I am not sure what you think Spring is going to buy you here, but I would inject a factory of some sort that spits out Runnable/Callable's.

private final ExecutorService executorParsers = Executors.newFixedThreadPool(10);

@Autowired
private CallableFactory myCallableFactory = new MyCallableFactory(); //create this factory

public void parse(List<MyObjInt> objs) {
   //... bunch of elided stuff ....

   CompletionService<AsupParseObj> parserService = new ExecutorCompletionService<AsupParseObj>(executorParsers);

   for (final AsupStoreObj obj : objs) {
      parserService.submit(myCallableFactory.createCallable(obj));
   }
}

You could also inject the ExecutorService with Spring too.

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