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I have only one file in my project called test.c; the code below does not compile if I do not define "TRUE". I use vc. I just want to understand the behavior. Please throw some light on this aspect.

#ifdef TRUE
static int a; 
static int a = 1; 
#else 
static int a = 1; 
static int a; 
#endif 

int main (void) 
{ 
    printf("%d\n", a);
    return 0; 
}
-----------------------
#ifdef TRUE     // both ok
int a; 
int a = 1; 
#else           // both ok
int a = 1; 
int a; 
#endif

int main (void) 
{ 
    printf("%d\n", a);
    return 0; 
}
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1  
Try including the error message. We are not clairvoyant. –  Winston Ewert Dec 7 '11 at 15:06
    
actually pasting the exact error message into your question is generally what you should be doing. –  Winston Ewert Dec 7 '11 at 15:40
    
'a' redefinition; different storage class –  caisp Dec 8 '11 at 12:43
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2 Answers

That is because you can not declare a variable after you have defined it. However you may define a variable after you declare it.

#ifdef TRUE
static int a; //Declaring variable a
static int a = 1; //define variable a
#else 
static int a = 1; //define variable a
static int a; //Error! a is already defined so you can not declare it
#endif 
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2  
Well technically, you may define it after you declare it. :P But +1. –  Dan Fego Dec 7 '11 at 15:10
    
+1 for your comment, I was seeing variable and thinking struct. –  Joe Dec 7 '11 at 15:15
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Apparently, the compiler does not let you redefine a variable that has been initialized..

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you get in hells kitchen if you allow mulitple defines of the same. –  Thomas Aug 1 '12 at 8:02
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