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I have a feeling I'm going to get alot of "YOU N000B" comments on this.

I have this class:

public partial class FindAndReplace : Form
{
    public FindAndReplace()
    {
        InitializeComponent();
    }

    private void button1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {

    }
}

and I want to be able to do something like this to store a reference to use in other functions:

public partial class FindAndReplace : Form
{
    SomeRefType m_TabRef; // Dont know what type to use
    public FindAndReplace(ref TabControl launguageTabs)
    {
        InitializeComponent();
        m_TabRef = languageTab;
    }

    private void button1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        // use m_TabRef here that will change the original I passed in
    }
}

One work around is to use a copy of the TabControl and return the positions I want to be flagged. I was just wondering If I could use the original.

Think this post might be usefull if people google it too.

If this was C++ it would be easy :/

share|improve this question
    
Well, C# is not C++ and many of the power features of C++ also make that language much harder to develop and debug in. Keep in mind that reference types are already references. Are you wanting to store a reference to the reference? – James Michael Hare Dec 7 '11 at 15:19
1  
Don't worry, when I first learned C# I too thought "where are my pointers?!", but eventually I learned that they're really there, I just don't have to write the asterisks. – Philip Dec 7 '11 at 15:26
up vote 5 down vote accepted

Since TabControl already a reference type you can simply use it:

TabControl m_TabRef;

public FindAndReplace(TabControl launguageTabs)
{
    m_TabRef = languageTab;

    // from now m_TabRef references the object instance
    // passed as launguageTabs reference
}
share|improve this answer

In C#, classes are reference types. So languageTabs is like a pointer to an object, it isn't the object itself. Therefore, you can just write this:

public partial class FindAndReplace : Form
{
    TabControl m_TabRef; // use TabControl 
    public FindAndReplace(TabControl launguageTabs)
    {
        InitializeComponent();
        m_TabRef = languageTab;
    }
}

This is different from structs in C# which are value types. Value types are passed by value by default, and that's where the ref keyword comes in. You shouldn't use the ref keyword unless you really know what it does; most of the time you won't need it.

share|improve this answer

You cannot have a ref member of a class; ref is only valid as a function parameter modifier.

Furthermore, it's quite likely that you have confused the pass-by-reference concept (which is exposed through ref) with the reference type concept (which is exposed through classes, which are reference types).

In all likelihood, you can simply forget that ref exists, remove all such references from your code and it will work the way you intended. If it does not, please be more specific about what you are trying to accomplish.

share|improve this answer

This ref will help only as a pass by reference, it is NOT a reference type.

(http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/14akc2c7.aspx)

You said you wanted to "store a reference"

There's a double post right here: Storing a reference in c#

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