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I have following problem.

I have database connection that are recycled (put back into pool).

For example:

{
 session sql(conn_str); // take connection from pool

 sql.exec("insert into ...")
} // at the end of the scope return connection to pool

However in certain cases recycling may be wrong - for example disconnect, or some other significant error.

So I want to automatically prevent from the connection being recycled. I want to implement following technique using std::uncaught_exception - so the exec() function would detect exceptions and prevent recycling:

session::exec(...)
{
   guard g(this)

   real_exec(...);
}

Where guard:

class guard {
public:
   guard(session *self) : self_(self) {}
   ~guard() {
      if(std::uncaught_exception()) {
        self->mark_as_connection_that_should_not_go_to_pool();
      }
   }
}

Now, I'm aware of http://www.gotw.ca/gotw/047.htm that does not recommend using std::uncaught_exception on the other case I don't see any wrong with my code also, the provides examples discussed.

Are there any possible problems with this code.

Note:

  1. I want this change to be non-intrusive so that SQL backend would be able to throw and not check for every case if it is critical or not.
  2. I don't want user to take any action about it so it would be transparent for him.
share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I don't see any advantage to your method over something more straightforward:

session::exec()
{
    try
    {
        real_exec();
    }
    catch(...)
    {
        mark_as_connection_that_should_not_go_to_pool();
        throw;
    }
}

If the verboseness of this solution bothers you, I will note that they haven't ripped macros out of C++ yet. I wouldn't prefer this version as it masks the underlying code and is kind of ugly.

#define GUARD try {
#define ENDGUARD } catch(...) { mark_as_connection_that_should_not_go_to_pool(); throw; }

session::exec()
{
    GUARD
    real_exec();
    ENDGUARD
}

Another possibility is to assume failure until success is achieved.

session::exec()
{
    mark_as_connection_that_should_not_go_to_pool();
    real_exec();
    mark_as_connection_that_may_go_to_pool();
}

Finally to answer the question of whether uncaught_exception will work as you've outlined, I will quote from Microsoft's documentation of the function:

In particular, uncaught_exception will return true when called from a destructor that is being invoked during an exception unwind.

It appears to do exactly what you'd expect.

share|improve this answer
    
The reason I don't use this method is because it is much more verbose. So if you have two dozen functions that do the same thing, the "guard" is simpler and cleared way to solve such problem IMHO. –  Artyom Dec 7 '11 at 19:40
    
Also std::uncaught_exception() is standard function, may be not so commonly used as try/catch –  Artyom Dec 7 '11 at 19:41
    
Is there any particular scenario that makes use of std::uncaught_exception() problematic for this particular case? –  Artyom Dec 7 '11 at 20:08
    
@Artyom, I'm not aware of any but as you say this is a rarely used function. I've added a supporting statement to my answer. –  Mark Ransom Dec 7 '11 at 20:31

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