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I have a master form for my website, and I want to dock a div to the top of the content area inside the master form. This div should always be visible despite scroll position. Is this possible?

A picture would explain it better.

enter image description here

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4  
+1 for Balsamiq! –  Matt Ball Dec 7 '11 at 16:19
    
@MДΓΓБДLL <3 balsamiq.com –  Rachel Dec 7 '11 at 16:20
7  
I was bored...do you mean like this? makeagif.com/i/8qut0B –  Greg Dec 7 '11 at 16:30
    
This effect requires JavaScript, is that an issue? –  zzzzBov Dec 7 '11 at 16:31
3  
try this out jsfiddle.net/YpKTP –  zzzzBov Dec 7 '11 at 16:41

8 Answers 8

up vote 9 down vote accepted

I posted a sample as a comment, so I suppose I'll write out a full answer to this.

The markup is pretty straight-forward, but there are some important notes for each section.

HTML

<div id="page">
    <div id="header">
        <div id="header-inner"> <!-- Note #1 -->
            <img src="http://placehold.it/300x100" />
        </div>
    </div>
    <div id="content">
        <!-- Some Content Here -->
    </div>
</div>

CSS

#page {
    padding: 100px;
    width: 300px;
}

#header,
#header-inner { /* Note #1 */
    height: 100px;
    width: 300px;
}

.scrolling { /* Note #2 */
    position: fixed;
    top: 0;
}

JavaScript

//jQuery used for simplicity
$(window).scroll(function(){
  $('#header-inner').toggleClass('scrolling', $(window).scrollTop() > $('#header').offset().top);

  //can be rewritten long form as:
  var scrollPosition, headerOffset, isScrolling;
  scrollPosition = $(window).scrollTop();
  headerOffset = $('#header').offset().top;
  isScrolling = scrollPosition > headerOffset;
  $('#header-inner').toggleClass('scrolling', isScrolling);
});

Note #1

The scrolling header will be attached to the top of the page using position: fixed, but this style will remove the content from content flow, which will cause the content to jump unless its container maintains the original height.

Note #2

Styles belong in CSS, however it may be difficult to properly align some elements with their original position. You may need to dynamically set the left or right css property via JavaScript.

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You'll need jQuery or the like, see my fiddle here

Edit

jQuery function, where .form is the content div and .banner is the div that is docked

$(window).scroll(function() {
    t = $('.form').offset();
    t = t.top;

    s = $(window).scrollTop();

    d = t-s;

    if (d < 0) {
        $('.banner').addClass('fixed');
        $('.banner').addClass('paddingTop');
    } else {
        $('.banner').removeClass('fixed');
        $('.banner').removeClass('paddingTop');
    }
});

.fixed {
    position:fixed;
    top:0px;
}
.paddingTop{
    padding-top:110px;
}
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Thank you. I'm accepting your answer because you took into account the offset for the master form's header rather than hardcoding it. Also, hope you don't mind but I'm going to add the jQuery function to your answer. –  Rachel Dec 7 '11 at 17:25
    
i don't mind <:-) –  ptriek Dec 7 '11 at 17:29
    
keep the CSS in CSS files. use addClass, removeClass, or toggleClass instead. –  zzzzBov Dec 7 '11 at 20:23
    
@zzzzBov thanks for the advice, I updated my answer. –  ptriek Dec 7 '11 at 20:47
    
@ptriek This actually gives me really jumpy scroll behavior if the height of the content is close to the scrollable area. I think it's becauase removing the docked div from the visual tree is changing the scroll position, which is firing the onScroll a 2nd time. –  Rachel Dec 8 '11 at 14:15

I created a new fiddle which I hope can be useful. The DIV can be arbitrary positioned in the page and stays visible when scrolling.

http://jsfiddle.net/mM4Df/

<div id="mydiv">
  fixed div
</div>

<div class="ghost">
  fixed div
</div>

CSS:

#mydiv { position: fixed;  background-color:Green; float:left; width:100%}
.ghost{opacity: 0}

probably there is a better solution than using a "ghost" but I do not know which.

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That's close, however the div is fixed and doesn't scroll with the rest of the page. It should stay at the top of the content area until the top of the content area leaves the page. Then it should be docked to the top of the page. –  Rachel Dec 7 '11 at 16:34
    
I see. Probably the JavaScript solution is better then. –  Paolo Dec 7 '11 at 16:37
    
+1 for giving me the "ghost" solution. I realize now I need something like that in place to prevent jumpy scroll behavior –  Rachel Dec 8 '11 at 14:16

Assume the top position(to the top of the screen) of the header div is 100px in the beginning, you can do like this: if the scroll top of window is over 100px, set the header div to fix position with top 0px; if the scroll top of window is less than 100px, set the position of the header div with the default layout. With jquery, it is sth like this:

$(document).scroll(function() {
    if ($(this).scrollTop() > 100) {
        $('div#header').css({ 
            "position" : 'fixed',
            "top" : 0 });
    } else {
        $('div#header').css({ "position" : 'relative', "top" : 0 });
    }
});

it is implemented with the scroll event.

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+1 for the right idea and working jQuery, although I'm accepting ptriek's answer since it doesn't require hard-coding the height, and can be attached to a div element instead of the main form. –  Rachel Dec 7 '11 at 17:34

Use CSS to fix its position.

Assuming your <div> has an ID "topdiv":

#topdiv {
    position: fixed;
    top: 0;
    left: 0
}

Note you'll have to set a margin-top for the content, because the fixed div will display "over" the content:

#contentarea { margin-top: 35px; }

Check this fiddle.

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My problem with that is my master form has a header of it's own, which can scroll off the page. So my header div is not always docked at the top of the page. –  Rachel Dec 7 '11 at 16:25
    
What if there is some stuff before the fixed div? –  Paolo Dec 7 '11 at 16:25
    
Hm there was no such thing on your mock-up. It depends a bit on the actual markup I guess, my answer was a bit generic. Could you provide more info like markup and current styling ? –  Didier Ghys Dec 7 '11 at 16:28
    
@DidierG. That's why I left a big space at the top of the content area.... –  Rachel Dec 7 '11 at 16:29

It sounds like what you're looking for is a header div with two properties:

  1. When it would normally be visible, it stays in its default position.
  2. When it would normally be invisible, it appears at the top of the screen.

In short, something a little bit like "max-top" (which doesn't exist as a css property).

If you want to do all of that, the quickest way may involve some JavaScript. Try this; if I get some time later I'll update this with some more code.

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I believe you are looking for a div that follows when you scroll down. This implementation can be seen for shopping carts on number of sites. You may want to look at http://kitchen.net-perspective.com/open-source/scroll-follow/

Another good link is: http://jqueryfordesigners.com/fixed-floating-elements/

Some related collection of scroll examples: http://webdesign14.com/30-tutorials-and-plugins-jquery-scroll/

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You can try this CSS. Maybe it is what you are looking for:

    html, body{
        text-align:center;
        margin:0px;
        background:#ABCFFF;
        height:100%;
        }
    .header-cont {
        width:100%;
        position:fixed;
        top:0px;
    }
    #header {
        height:50px;
        background:#F0F0F0;
        border:1px solid #CCC;
        width: 100%;
        margin:auto;
    }
    .content-cont {
        width:100%;
        position:absolute; /* to place it somewhere on the screen */
        top:60px;
        bottom:60px; /* makes it lock to the bottom */
        overflow:auto;
    }
    #content {
        background:#F0F0F0;
        border:1px solid #CCC;
        width:960px;
        position:relative;  
        min-height:99.6%;
        height:auto;
        overflow: hidden;
        margin:auto;            
    }
    .footer-cont {
        width:100%;
        position:fixed;
        bottom:0px;
    }
    #footer {
        height:50px;
        background:#F0F0F0;
        border:1px solid #CCC;
        width: 100%;
        margin:auto;
    }
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