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I have a JSON object as {a: 1, b: 2, c: [4, 5, 6], d: {x: 7, y: 8, z: [9, 0]}}, how do I convert it to a form of elements?

I want to convert to this:

<input type="hidden" name="obj[a]" value="1"/>
<input type="hidden" name="obj[b]" value="2"/>
<input type="hidden" name="obj[c][]" value="4"/>
<input type="hidden" name="obj[c][]" value="5"/>
<input type="hidden" name="obj[c][]" value="6"/>
<input type="hidden" name="obj[d][x]" value="7"/>
<input type="hidden" name="obj[d][y]" value="8"/>
<input type="hidden" name="obj[d][z][]" value="9"/>
<input type="hidden" name="obj[d][z][]" value="0"/>

Any ideas?

share|improve this question
    
may be have a jquery-plugin can do it? –  Jasper Dec 7 '11 at 16:42

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

These should do it:

with jQuery

var obj = { a: 1, b: 2, c: [4, 5, 6], d: { x: 7, y: 8, z: [9, 0] } };

function analyzer(o, trail) {
    if (!trail) trail = 'obj';
    for (var n in o) {
        var el = $('<input>', { type: 'hidden' });
        el.attr('name', trail + '[' + n + ']');
        if (typeof o[n] === 'number') {
            el.attr('value', o[n]);
            $('body').append(el);
        } else if (Array.isArray(o[n])) {
            el.attr('name',function(i,v) { return v + '[]'; });
            for (var i = 0; i < o[n].length; ++i) {
                el.clone().attr('value', o[n][i] ).appendTo('body');
            }
        } else {
            analyzer(o[n], trail + '[' + n + ']');
        }
    }
}
analyzer(obj);

JSFIDDLE DEMO

FYI, you can find a compatibility patch for Array.isArray at MDN.

Or you can use jQuery.isArray() instead.


jQuery reworked

You may prefer this a bit. It doesn't create an element, then clone it in the Array loop, but rather uses a little redundant code to create the elements.

function analyzer(o, trail) {
    if (!trail) trail = 'obj';
    for (var n in o) {
        if (typeof o[n] === 'number') {
            $('<input>', { type: 'hidden', name: trail + '[' + n + ']', value: o[n] })
                .appendTo( 'body' );
        } else if (Array.isArray(o[n])) {
            for (var i = 0; i < o[n].length; ++i) {
                $('<input>', { type: 'hidden', name: trail + '[' + n + '][]', value: o[n][i] })
                    .appendTo( 'body' );
            }
        } else {
            analyzer(o[n], trail + '[' + n + ']');
        }
    }
}

JSFIDDLE DEMO


with native DOM API

If you're having any performance issues, use the native API, and cache the DOM selection.

function analyzer(o, trail) {
    var el;
    if (!trail) trail = 'obj';
    for (var n in o) {
        if (typeof o[n] === 'number') {
            el = document.createElement('input');
            el.type = 'hidden';
            el.name = trail + '[' + n + ']';
            el.value = o[n];
            container.appendChild( el );
        } else if (Array.isArray(o[n])) {
            for (var i = 0; i < o[n].length; ++i) {
                el = document.createElement('input');
                el.type = 'hidden';
                el.name = trail + '[' + n + '][]';
                el.value = o[n][i];
                container.appendChild( el );
            }
        } else {
            analyzer(o[n], trail + '[' + n + ']');
        }
    }
}

JSFIDDLE DEMO

Doesn't require much more code, should work in all typically supported browsers, and should be very fast.


native API reworked to shorten

function analyzer(o, trail) {
    var el;
    if (!trail) trail = 'obj';
    for (var n in o) {
        (el = document.createElement('input')).type = 'hidden';
        el.name = trail + '[' + n + ']';
        if (typeof o[n] === 'number') {
            container.appendChild( el ).value = o[n];
        } else if (Array.isArray(o[n])) {
            el.name += '[]';
            for (var i = 0; i < o[n].length; ++i) {
                container.appendChild( el.cloneNode(false) ).value = o[n][i];
            }
        } else {
            analyzer(o[n], trail + '[' + n + ']');
        }
    }
}

JSFIDDLE DEMO

share|improve this answer
    
Wow is working but may be a bit slowly, I'm testing now, back soon. Thanks. –  Jasper Dec 7 '11 at 17:20
    
@joe: Let me know how it goes. It should be pretty quick, but we can speed things up if we use some native API calls in place of jQuery. –  RightSaidFred Dec 7 '11 at 17:23
    
That is really great, is my mistake, I like it very much, thank you++ –  Jasper Dec 7 '11 at 17:31
    
@joe: You're welcome. FYI, I just added a third solution using only native API. –  RightSaidFred Dec 7 '11 at 17:33
1  
Wow wow you are so amazing it is great. –  Jasper Dec 7 '11 at 18:05

For a quick response -

Create a function that loops through objects. Use a for in loop to create a string to concatonate these inputs. Test if the value found for each object contains a primitive value, array or object`.

E.g. Object.prototype.toString.call(val) === '[object Object]';

If it does, recursively call the function to extract the values from said found object / array

share|improve this answer
    
Add jQuery.parseJSON for the first part of the question. –  Álvaro G. Vicario Dec 7 '11 at 17:01

Here this does not give the code for creating the HTML, but what it does it create an object with two arrays. One contains the name and the other contains the value. Also, this will work no matter how deeply you nest your objects.

Array.prototype.isArray=true;//Not sure this is the best solution, but it seems to work

function parse(a){
  var b,c,i,obj={
    name:[],
    value:[]
  };
  for(x in a){
    b=a[x];
    if(b.isArray){
      for(i=0;i<b.length;i++){
        obj.name.push('['+x+'][]');
        obj.value.push(b[i]);
      }
    }
    else if(typeof b==='object'){
      var f=x;
      var d=parse(b);
      for(i=0;i<d.name.length;i++){
        d.name[i]='['+f+']'+d.name[i];
      }
      console.log(d.name);
      obj.name.push.apply(obj.name, d.name);
      obj.value.push.apply(obj.value, d.value);
    }
    else{
      obj.name.push('['+x+']');
      obj.value.push(b);
    }
  }
  return obj;
}
console.log(parse({a: 1, b: 2, c: [4, 5, 6], d: {x: 7, y: 8, z: [9, 0]}}));
share|improve this answer
    
I was about to ask how b.isArray would work, but then I saw your Array.prototype extension. Seems like a valid approach to me. –  RightSaidFred Dec 7 '11 at 17:39
    
I'll try it. Thanks. –  Jasper Dec 7 '11 at 18:06

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