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Considering this class

Class 1

class myclass {
    public static function myfunction($condition, $string)
    {
        if ($condition) {
            // A lot of code here
            // This is just a stupid example
            echo $string;
        }
    }
}

Class 2

class myclass {
    public static function myfunction($condition, $string)
    {
        // A lot of code here
        // This is just a stupid example
        echo $string;
    }
}

and the following files:

File 1

myclass::myfunction(($i > 1), '$i is > of 1');
myclass::myfunction(($i > 2), '$i is > of 2');
myclass::myfunction(($i > 3), '$i is > of 3');
myclass::myfunction(($i > 4), '$i is > of 4');
myclass::myfunction(($i > 5), '$i is > of 5');
...
myclass::myfunction(($i > 50), '$i is > of 50'); // this is the amount of functions calls in my project more or less...

File 2

if ($i > 1) { myclass::myfunction('$i is > of 1'); }
if ($i > 2) { myclass::myfunction('$i is > of 2'); }
if ($i > 3) { myclass::myfunction('$i is > of 3'); }
if ($i > 4) { myclass::myfunction('$i is > of 4'); }
if ($i > 5) { myclass::myfunction('$i is > of 5'); }
...
if ($i > 50) { myclass::myfunction('$i is > of 50'); }

Which file will run faster (considering both 2 different classes) on the same work base? Does PHP cache classes method request or just keep looking for the class, the method and then execute it? Does it change that much if I keep the condition inside the method (so the method will be executed)?

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3  
What happened when you benchmarked it? :) –  rdlowrey Dec 7 '11 at 16:52
    
In the first example, myfunction() will be run every time, thus pushing that function call onto the execution stack. In the second example, sometimes that won't happen. I vote for second example as the faster one, albeit possibly by a negligible margin. Ultimately, just try it. –  Wiseguy Dec 7 '11 at 16:56
    
@rdlowrey, are you serious? Should I manually edit all the 50+ condition adding if statements all over my framework to benchmark it? I'm speaking theoretically right because it was hard to get the benchmark done... –  Jefffrey Dec 7 '11 at 17:23
    
@JeffPigarelli No, you would isolate the two operations and loop over each x number of times in a one-off file, totaling things like time, memory used, etc. –  rdlowrey Dec 7 '11 at 17:33
1  
@JeffPigarelli Touché, sir. A quick googling turned up little in the way of tutorials. Like any experiment, the important thing is to maintain a ceteris paribus environment. All other things being equal, which of these two loops runs the fastest when iterated say, 10k times. You can use microtime() before and after to determine this. You can track memory using memory_get_peak_usage() and memory_get_usage(). Best to do this on a server that isn't performing a bunch of other operations at the same time to maintain the integrity of your independent variables. Also, test multiple times, not once –  rdlowrey Dec 7 '11 at 17:46

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I would guess that case 2 is technically faster because you don't have to pass the expression and the function isn't even called if the expression is false (thanks ajreal!). Even in the worst case situation, where the expression is always false, the second would be faster (in C++ at least) unless the compiler optimized passing the expression out.

However, they are both theoretically the same running time (BigO-wise) and if you are having performance issues, this isn't the cause of them. In other words, the difference is negligible. Premature optimization is the root of all evil.

If you still insist on thinking this is significant, it shouldn't be hard to benchmark yourself. Try running each ten thousand times with random expressions/strings and compare the time difference.

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Second is faster as it does not calling the static method 50 times (unless $i is 50).
This look like some design flaw, grouping the comparison could work better for you.

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