Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

First some background. We have a vendor application which generates logs and configuration files and stores them in a particular set of folders. On its own, it will then gzip logs after a predetermined amount of time.

We rsync these folders to a backup server using a script on that server periodically (at least once a day). To reduce space, we run another script to gzip any file which hasn't been modified for 30 days. This causes an issue, because eventually the source server will run its rsync and send up the *.gz files to the backup server. Since we will then have a copy of both the older plaintext file as well as the newer GZ file, when our compression script runs it tries to overwrite the .gz file. This creates a race condition.

I am working on the following code snippet to fix it. Here is my test script.

#!/bin/bash

#Array of local directories
localDirs=("./testdir/")

#Loop through local directories
for i in "${localDirs[@]}"
        do
#Find non-gz files in current local dir
        for FILE in `ls --hide=*.gz $i`;
#If the file doesn't have a matching .gz file, compress it
                do if [ ! -f ${FILE}.gz ]
                        then
                        echo "$FILE: Gzip doesn't exist"
                        echo compressing $file
#test to make sure that the file is 30 days old, and if it is, gzip
                        #find $i$FILE -type f -mtime 30 -exec gzip {} \;
                fi
                done
        done
exit

This is not working - it still seems to be listing every file within the directory, whether or not it has a gzip counterpart. Any other suggestions on the code would be greatly appreciated, i'm still a bit of a BASH novice.

EDIT:

Have modified the code to this based on recommendations (had no idea backticks were deprecated!):

#!/bin/bash

#Array of local directories
localDirs=("./testdir/")

#Loop through local directories
for i in "${localDirs[@]}"
        do
#Test set FILE equal to non-gz files in current local dir
        for FILE in $(find $i ! -name "*.gz")
#If the file doesn't have a matching .gz file, compress it
                do if [ ! -f ${FILE}.gz ]
                        then
                        echo "$FILE: Gzip doesn't exist"
                        echo compressing $FILE
#test to make sure that the file is 30 days old, and if it is, gzip
                        find $FILE -type f -mtime 30 -exec gzip {} \;
                fi
                done
        done
exit

I have created a file called ./testdir/oldfile.txt, and also a file called ./testdir/oldfile.txt.gzip. It still tries to compress ./testdir/oldfile.txt into ./testdir/oldfile.txt.gzip. What's strange is that if I remove the compress text, the echos wont show the oldfile listed, since it has a corresponding .gzip file. But it still wants to compress it. Not sure whats causing the behavior.

Here's the output (with the compress statement commented out):

[logsync@baschinfs01 ~]$ ls -lah testdir
total 12K
drwxr-x--- 2 logsync logsync 4.0K Dec  7 17:18 .
drwxr-x--- 5 logsync logsync 4.0K Dec  7 17:33 ..
-rw-r----- 1 logsync logsync    0 Dec  7 16:13 cat
-rw-r----- 1 logsync logsync    0 Dec  7 16:13 dog
-rw-r----- 1 logsync logsync    0 Dec  7 16:13 duck
-rw-r----- 1 logsync logsync    0 Nov  7 12:21 oldfile.txt
-rw-r----- 1 logsync logsync   32 Nov  7 12:21 oldfile.txt.gz
-rw-r----- 1 logsync logsync    0 Dec  7 16:12 testfile
-rw-r----- 1 logsync logsync    0 Dec  7 16:13 testfile2
-rw-r----- 1 logsync logsync    0 Dec  7 16:13 testfile2.gz
-rw-r----- 1 logsync logsync    0 Dec  7 16:13 testfile3
-rw-r----- 1 logsync logsync    0 Dec  7 16:13 testfile3.gz
-rw-r----- 1 logsync logsync    0 Dec  7 16:13 testfile4.gz
-rw-r----- 1 logsync logsync    0 Dec  7 16:13 testfile5
-rw-r----- 1 logsync logsync    0 Dec  7 16:12 testfile.gz
[logsync@baschinfs01 ~]$ ./test.sh
./testdir/: Gzip doesn't exist
compressing ./testdir/
./testdir/duck: Gzip doesn't exist
compressing ./testdir/duck
./testdir/dog: Gzip doesn't exist
compressing ./testdir/dog
./testdir/testfile5: Gzip doesn't exist
compressing ./testdir/testfile5
./testdir/cat: Gzip doesn't exist
compressing ./testdir/cat

Here's the output with the compress statement left in:

[logsync@baschinfs01 ~]$ ls -lah testdir
total 12K
drwxr-x--- 2 logsync logsync 4.0K Dec  7 17:18 .
drwxr-x--- 5 logsync logsync 4.0K Dec  7 17:35 ..
-rw-r----- 1 logsync logsync    0 Dec  7 16:13 cat
-rw-r----- 1 logsync logsync    0 Dec  7 16:13 dog
-rw-r----- 1 logsync logsync    0 Dec  7 16:13 duck
-rw-r----- 1 logsync logsync    0 Nov  7 12:21 oldfile.txt
-rw-r----- 1 logsync logsync   32 Nov  7 12:21 oldfile.txt.gz
-rw-r----- 1 logsync logsync    0 Dec  7 16:12 testfile
-rw-r----- 1 logsync logsync    0 Dec  7 16:13 testfile2
-rw-r----- 1 logsync logsync    0 Dec  7 16:13 testfile2.gz
-rw-r----- 1 logsync logsync    0 Dec  7 16:13 testfile3
-rw-r----- 1 logsync logsync    0 Dec  7 16:13 testfile3.gz
-rw-r----- 1 logsync logsync    0 Dec  7 16:13 testfile4.gz
-rw-r----- 1 logsync logsync    0 Dec  7 16:13 testfile5
-rw-r----- 1 logsync logsync    0 Dec  7 16:12 testfile.gz
[logsync@baschinfs01 ~]$ ./test.sh 
./testdir/: Gzip doesn't exist
compressing ./testdir/
gzip: ./testdir/oldfile.txt.gz already exists; do you wish to overwrite (y or n)? n
        not overwritten
gzip: ./testdir/oldfile.txt.gz already has .gz suffix -- unchanged
./testdir/duck: Gzip doesn't exist
compressing ./testdir/duck
./testdir/dog: Gzip doesn't exist
compressing ./testdir/dog
./testdir/testfile5: Gzip doesn't exist
compressing ./testdir/testfile5
./testdir/cat: Gzip doesn't exist
compressing ./testdir/cat
[logsync@baschinfs01 ~]$

As you can see its still trying to compress the files, even though the rest of the statements in the IF conditional get ignored.

EDIT #2: Finally got it working with some hackery. Here is the final code that is getting spooned into the script (for now until I can find a better way to do it):

#!/bin/bash

COMPRESSWINDOWSTART=2592000
COMPRESSWINDOWEND=2678400
DATE=$(date +%s)

#Array of local directories
localDirs=("./testdir/")

#Loop through local directories
for i in "${localDirs[@]}"
        do
        echo "Entering $i directory"
#Test set FILE equal to non-gz files in current local dir
        for FILE in $(find $i ! -name "*.gz")
#If the file doesn't have a matching .gz file, compress it
                do if [ ! -e ${FILE}.gz ]
                        then
                                echo "$FILE: Gzip doesn't exist"
                                echo compressing $FILE
#test to make sure that the file is 30 days old, and if it is, gzip
                                FILEMTIME=$(stat -c %Y $FILE)
                                FILEAGE=$(($DATE-$FILEMTIME))
                                echo fileage is $FILEAGE
                                if [ $FILEAGE -gt $COMPRESSWINDOWSTART -a $FILEAGE -lt $COMPRESSWINDOWEND ]
                                        then
                                        echo $FILEAGE is greater than $COMPRESSWINDOWSTART and less than $COMPRESSWINDOWEND
                                        gzip $FILE
                                fi
                fi
                done
        done
exit

This is tested and working in my test cases. Hopefully it merges smoothely into the main script. Thank you everyone for your help!!!!!

share|improve this question
1  
how about rsync --exclude="*.gz" ? –  ajreal Dec 7 '11 at 17:00
2  
replace the for i in ... to for file in $(find . ! -name "*.gz") ? –  ajreal Dec 7 '11 at 17:06
1  
+1 good question, well formatted and shows some research before posting! for f in $(find ..) is a good idea. But to work with the problem as presented, are you saying that if you run ls --hide=*.gz $i (with appropriate values for $i) from the command line, that it works there but doesn't work in the for loop? I bet it doesn't work on the cmd-line either. As a separate rant, Backquotes where deprecated as early as 1995, why do people keep using them! ;-) use $( ... ) and live happily ever after! Honest! Good luck. –  shellter Dec 7 '11 at 17:15
1  
Now I'm suspcious of your find $FILE ..... The first param to find is usually a path name, not a filename. Again, make sure this is producing the output you expect after substituting in appropriate values for variables. Good luck. –  shellter Dec 7 '11 at 17:44
1  
Also, you said '(default for gzip is filename.ext.gzip)'. Are you sure, all of your code and examples show .gz, which is what I would think of as the default gzip fileExt. Or did you mean filename.ext.gz? If you're really getting files with exts .gzip, then either add to code handle that possiblity, OR build a script to fix that inconsistency as a batch process, separate from this script. Good luck. –  shellter Dec 7 '11 at 17:49

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Edited in the final code. As mentioned in the comments relying on find was causing some issues I think. Based on what it was doing it looks like the gzip was trying to gzip every file in the directory when it would see ./testdir/ as one of the items in the list. This avoids that by now always using a filemtime and the current date.

share|improve this answer

the find command in your first edit is ignoring your prior tests and just compressing anything of type file ( -type f ) and modified 30 minutes ago

find $FILE -type f -mtime 30 -exec gzip {} \;

Similar to comment#2 you could do the following

find $FILE -type f -not -name '*.gz' -mtime 30 -exec gzip {} \;

Remember that file could be compressed even if their extension is not gzip

luis@linux:~> gzip -c talk.tmp > talk
luis@linux:~> file talk
talk: gzip compressed data, was "talk.tmp", from Unix, last modified: Mon Oct  7 15:07:10 2013
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.