Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I recently read this question which had a solution about labeling loops in Java.

I am wondering if such a loop-naming system exists in Python. I have been in a situation multiple times where I do need to break out of an outer for loop from an inner for loop. Usually, I solve this problem by putting the inner loop in a function that returns (among others) a boolean which is used as a breaking condition. But labeling loops for breaking seems a lot simpler and I would like to try that, if such functionality exists in python

Does anyone know if it does?

share|improve this question
    
Check the second answer, hopefully it helps some. But from what I can see, no such system exists. –  John Doe Dec 7 '11 at 17:37
    
"But labeling loops for breaking seems a lot simpler "? Simpler than proper functions? How so? Can you provide some evidence of how this would be "simpler"? –  S.Lott Dec 7 '11 at 18:38
1  
I don't have an example handy, but it would be a situation where I would have to create a function which will be used only in that one spot. Perhaps "simpler" was the wrong word. What I meant was that I wouldn't have to define a new function just for use in that ONE spot. –  inspectorG4dget Dec 7 '11 at 18:46
    
What's wrong with nested function definitions? Also, what about redesigning the inner loop to avoid the break? –  S.Lott Dec 7 '11 at 19:01
1  
I just don't like them. I guess it's a personal preference –  inspectorG4dget Dec 7 '11 at 20:43

4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

There was a proposal to include named loops in python PEP3136, however, it was rejected with an explanation here. The rejection was mostly due to the rare number of circumstances where code readability would be improved by including this construct.

share|improve this answer

Though there are reasons to include named looped in language construct you can easily avoid it in python without loss of readability. An implementation of the referred example in python

>>> try:
    for i in xrange(0,5):
        for j in xrange(0,6):
            if i*j > 6:
                print "Breaking"
                raise StopIteration
            print i," ",j
except StopIteration:
    print "Done"


0   0
0   1
0   2
0   3
0   4
0   5
1   0
1   1
1   2
1   3
1   4
1   5
2   0
2   1
2   2
2   3
Breaking
Done
>>> 

I solve this problem by putting the inner loop in a function that returns (among others) a boolean which is used as a breaking condition.

I think you should try this. This is very pythonic, simple and readable.

share|improve this answer
    
+1. Using exceptions for flow control is perfectly cromulent in Python, though it is considered bad style in other languages, usually for performance reasons. –  kindall Dec 7 '11 at 19:55

Nope.

Depending on what you are doing, there is good chance you can use something from itertools to flatten your nested for loops into a single for loop.

share|improve this answer

Here's a way to break out of multiple, nested blocks using a context manager:

import contextlib

@contextlib.contextmanager
def escapable():
    class Escape(RuntimeError): pass
    class Unblock(object):
        def escape(self):
            raise Escape()

    try:
        yield Unblock()
    except Escape:
        pass

You can use it to break out of multiple loops:

with escapable() as a:
    for i in xrange(30):
        for j in xrange(30):
            if i * j > 6:
                a.escape()

And you can even nest them:

with escapable() as a:
    for i in xrange(30):
        with escapable() as b:
            for j in xrange(30):
                if i * j == 12:
                    b.escape()  # Break partway out
                if i * j == 40:
                    a.escape()  # Break all the way out
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.