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I am trying to count all the white pixels in an OpenCV binary image. My current code is as follows:

  whitePixels = 0;
  for (int i = 0; i < height; ++i)
    for (int j = 0; j < width; ++j)
      if (binary.at<int>(i, j) != 0)
        ++whitePixels;

However, after profiling with gprof I've found that this is a very slow piece of code, and a large bottleneck in the program.

Is there a method which can compute the same value faster?

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Did you try changing the height and width? I mean looping on the width and then height ? This may improve the loop, depends how the image is layed out in memory. –  Yochai Timmer Dec 7 '11 at 17:50
2  
Can you access the image data directly instead through this at() function? –  jrok Dec 7 '11 at 18:02
    
Doing as jrok suggests will probably be faster. I wonder if this faq entry is relevant. –  Brian Dec 7 '11 at 18:08
    
Thanks all, I think direct data access must be the way to go. And something tells me that changing the order of the loop will be quicker too. I'll give it a go. –  Bill Cheatham Dec 7 '11 at 18:12
1  
The at() function is VERY slow in Debug mode, although is (almost) as fast as direct pointer access in Release. It contains a CV_DbgAssert() to check bounds, which is lazy. –  sammy Dec 7 '11 at 19:35
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4 Answers 4

up vote 16 down vote accepted

cvCountNonZero. Usually the OpenCV implementation of a task is heavily optimized.

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3  
@karlphillip you mean cv::countNonZero? –  Josh Bleecher Snyder Dec 7 '11 at 18:34
    
Perfect, an optimised, built-in function. Just what I was looking for. –  Bill Cheatham Dec 7 '11 at 20:06
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You can use paralell computing. You divide the image in N parts and run your code in differents threads then you get the result of each threads and after this you can add this results for obtain the finally amount.

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1  
Bill's algorithm should probably, if implemented properly, be memory-bound rather than CPU-bound. On a normal desktop computer, usually parallelization is not helpful for memory-bound tasks. –  Brian Dec 7 '11 at 18:11
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The last pixel in a row is usually followed by the first pixel in the next row (C code):

limit=width*height;
i=0;
while (i<limit)
{
  if (binary.at<int>(0,i) != 0) ++whitePixels;
  ++i;
}
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Or implement it as a sliding pointer which will do away with the index. –  Olof Forshell Dec 10 '11 at 12:45
    
And/or test two at a time at [i] and at [i+1] and add 2 to the index/pointer. This will halve the loops required. –  Olof Forshell Dec 10 '11 at 12:46
    
A continuity test should be done on the matrix before with isContinuous(). If the matrix is not continuous, this method will fail. –  Jean-Philippe Jodoin Nov 16 '12 at 12:41
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Actually binary.at<int>(i, j) is slow access!

here is  simple code that access faster than yours.

for (int i = 0; i < height; ++i)
{
uchar * pixel = image.ptr<uchar>(i);
    for (int j = 0; j < width; ++j)
{
  if(pixel[j]!=0)
   {
      //do your job
   }
}
}
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