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Does anyone know how to disable auto parsing of chars such as “>” so that they never show up as “&qt;” when they are displayed in the browser? I thought that it was just related to xml parsing but it appears to be a global issue where VS uses “intelligent” parsing of strings and sometimes displays them as the actual char and sometimes converts them. Any suggestions?

Ex. 1:

C#:

public string kmlStuff = "";
    protected void Page_Load(object sender, EventArgs e) {
        kmlStuff="]]>";
    }

Aspx:

<asp:Content ID="Content2" ContentPlaceHolderID="MainContent" runat="server">
    <div id="errorM">
        <%=kmlStuff %>
    </div>
</asp:Content>

Html of browser output (is wrong):

<div id="errorM">
    ]]&gt;
</div>

What I want to show up:

<div id="errorM">
        ]]>
</div>

Ex. 2:

C#:

public string kmlStuff = "";
    protected void Page_Load(object sender, EventArgs e) {
        kmlStuff="<div></div>";
    }

Aspx:

<asp:Content ID="Content2" ContentPlaceHolderID="MainContent" runat="server">
    <div id="errorM">
        <%=kmlStuff %>
    </div>
</asp:Content>

Html of browser output (is right):

<div id="errorM">
<div></div>
</div>
share|improve this question
    
VS does nothing of this kind, it is just an IDE. It's asp.net that's responsible. Still the behavior looks utterly stupid to me. – CodesInChaos Dec 7 '11 at 17:56
1  
This is a great feature of ASP.NET, you do not want to disable this, you want to work with it, which @See-Sharp explained below. – Chris Marisic Dec 7 '11 at 18:00
    
@ChrisMarisic I don't know much about webforms(I prefer razor), but whatever happens in these examples it inconsistent and most likely doesn't protect against xss. My understanding is that to protect against xss you should use <%:. – CodesInChaos Dec 7 '11 at 18:01
    
@CodeInChaos that's most definitely just built in ASP.NET encoding – Chris Marisic Dec 7 '11 at 18:04
    
ASP.NET 3.5 does not do this for me. I get actual ]]> in the output. Maybe you have some sort of output filter in your stack? – Matthew Dec 7 '11 at 18:34
up vote 3 down vote accepted

Use this

c#

public string kmlStuff = "";
    protected void Page_Load(object sender, EventArgs e) {
        kmlStuff= Server.HtmlEncode("]]>");
    }


ASpx

<asp:Content ID="Content2" ContentPlaceHolderID="MainContent" runat="server">
    <div id="errorM">
        <%=Server.HtmlDecode(kmlStuff) %>
    </div>
</asp:Content>

**Sample:

using System;
using System.IO;
using System.Web;
using System.Web.UI;
public partial class _Default : Page
{
    protected void Page_Load(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
    // This could mess up HTML.
    string text = "you & me > them"; // 1
    // Replace > with >
    string htmlEncoded = Server.HtmlEncode(text); // 2
    // Now has the > again.
    string original = Server.HtmlDecode(htmlEncoded); // 3
    // This is how you can access the Server in any class.
    string alsoEncoded = HttpContext.Current.Server.HtmlEncode(text); // 4
    StringWriter stringWriter = new StringWriter();
    using (HtmlTextWriter writer = new HtmlTextWriter(stringWriter))
    {
        // Write a DIV with encoded text.
        writer.RenderBeginTag(HtmlTextWriterTag.Div);
        writer.WriteEncodedText(text);
        writer.RenderEndTag();
    }
    string html = stringWriter.ToString(); // 5
    }
}

**

share|improve this answer
    
+1 Encode/Decode is definitely what is needed here. Don't need XSS attacks. – Chris Marisic Dec 7 '11 at 17:59
    
nope, still showing up as &gt; – SomeoneElse Dec 7 '11 at 18:05
    
see update sample solution – Amit Ranjan Dec 7 '11 at 18:11
    
Thanks a lot!!! – SomeoneElse Dec 7 '11 at 21:45

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