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I am new to perl programming. I want read file data, then sort record on column 1 and then column2(remove repeated record) and stored sorted record into another file. following is my data

First column and second column is separated by tab

 user1 name       user2 name

    abc               xyz
    adc               xyz
    abc               xyz
    pqr               tyu
    xyz               abc
    tyu               pqr
    abc               pqr

In this example I want first sort record on user1 name and then user2 name and also at the time of sorting i want to remove repeated record.

Output should be as follow

user1 name        user2 name
  abc              pqr
  abc              xyz
  adc              xyz
  pqr              tyu
  tyu              pqr
  xyz              abc

please let me know how we can implement this perl?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

It all depends how you store your data. I'm not sure how you plan to store your information since you're in class and may or may not have learned about references. For example, if you don't know references, you might do something like this:

my @array;
foreach my $value (<INPUT>) {
   chomp $value;
   my ($user1, $user2) = split (" ", $value);
   push (@array, "$user1:$user2");
}

This will store both values as a single string. This is quite common if don't know about references.

If you know about references, you'd probably do this:

my @array;
foreach my $value (<INPUT>) {
   chomp $value;
   my @line = split (" ", $value);
   push (@array, \@line);
}

What I can tell you is that the sort subroutine allows you to create a function to compare and sort values. When you use your own function in sort, you get two values $a and $b which represent the values you're sorting. You can manipulate these, and then you return a -1 if $a is less than $b or 1 if $a is greater than $b or return a zero if they're both equal. Perl gives you two operators <=> and cmp to make this a bit easier.

Let's assume you're storing the values as $user1:$user2 since you haven't learned about references yet. Your sort routine might look like this.

sub sort {
    my ($a_col1, $a_col2) = split (/:/, $a);
    my ($b_col1, $b_col2) = split (/:/, $b);

    # Now we compare $a to $b. First, we can compare the
    # User 1 column:

    if ($a_col1 lt $b_col1) {
        return -1;    #$a < $b
    }
    elsif ($a_col1 gt $b_col1) {
        return 1;     #$a > $b
    }

    # If we're down here, it's because column 1 matches
    # for both $a and $b. We'll have to compare column #2
    # to see which one is bigger.

    if ($a_col2 lt $b_col2) {
       return -1;   #$a < $b
    }
    elsif ($a_col2 gt $b_col2) {
       return 1;    #$a > $b
    }

    #We're down here because both column #1 and column #2 match for both
    #$a and $b. They must be equal

    return 0;
}

Now, my sort will look something like this:

my @new_array = sort(\&sort, @array);

Note: This is not the way I'd personally do it. I'd probably use the built in cmp operator and take some shortcuts. However, I wanted to take this apart piece-by-piece, so you can understand it.

By the way, if the teacher decides you should sort the second column before the first, you can easily modify your sort subroutine by just changing the less than and greater than signs around.


Here's my test program:

#! /usr/bin/env perl

use strict;
use warnings;

#Putting my data in `@array`

my @array;
foreach my $entry (<DATA>) {
    chomp $entry;
    my ($user1, $user2) = split " ",  $entry;
    push @array, "$user1:$user2";
}

# Sorting my data

my @new_array = sort \&sort, @array;

#Now printing out my data nice and sorted...

foreach my $element (@new_array) {
    my ($user1, $user2) = split (/:/, $element);
    print "$user1\t\t$user2\n";
}

#
# END OF PROGRAM
##################################################

##################################################
# Sort subroutine I'm using to sort the data
#
sub sort {
    my ($a_col1, $a_col2) = split (/:/, $a);
    my ($b_col1, $b_col2) = split (/:/, $b);

    # Now we compare $a to $b. First, we can compare the
    # User 1 column:

    if ($a_col1 lt $b_col1) {
        return -1;    #$a < $b
    }
    elsif ($a_col1 gt $b_col1) {
        return 1;     #$a > $b
    }

    # If we're down here, it's because column 1 matches
    # for both $a and $b. We'll have to compare column #2
    # to see which one is bigger.

    if ($a_col2 lt $b_col2) {
        return -1;   #$a < $b

   }
    elsif ($a_col2 gt $b_col2) {
        return 1;    #$a > $b
    }

    #We're down here because both column #1 and column #2 match for both
    #$a and $b. They must be equal

    return 0;
}

__DATA__
david       fu
david       bar
albert      foofoo
sandy       barbar
albert      foobar
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#!/usr/bin/env perl
use strict;
use warnings;
my @list = <DATA>;
my $prev;
for (sort @list) {
    next if $prev && $_ eq $prev;
    $prev = $_;
    print;
}
__DATA__
    abc               xyz
    adc               xyz
    abc               xyz
    pqr               tyu
    xyz               abc
    tyu               pqr
    abc               pqr
share|improve this answer

Maybe not production code worthy, but here's an approach:

#!/usr/bin/perl

use strict;
use warnings;

my %seen;
print join "",
    grep {$_ !~ /^\s+$/ && !$seen{$_}++}
    sort {$a !~ /^ user/ <=> $b !~ /^ user/ || 
    $a cmp $b} <DATA>;

__DATA__
 user1 name       user2 name

    abc               xyz
    adc               xyz
    abc               xyz
    pqr               tyu
    xyz               abc
    tyu               pqr
    abc               pqr

Output:

 user1 name       user2 name
    abc               pqr   
    abc               xyz
    adc               xyz
    pqr               tyu
    tyu               pqr
    xyz               abc

The most unconventional part here is the $a !~ /^ user/ <=> $b !~ /^ user/ sort condition. $a !~ /^ user/ evaluates 1 (true) for all lines except the first, where it will evaluate to 0 (false), so the header is put first, and trailing lines fall through to the second sort condition, which produces the desired result.

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Or it could be as simple as:

print sort <DATA>;

__DATA__
    abc xyz
    pqr tyu
    xyz abc
    adc xyz
    tyu pqr
    abc pqr
    abc xyz

But only if your data is as simple as this. If the data in each column varies in length, each column must be as wide as the longest item. like so:

__DATA__
    abc              |xyz       |<-- other data in record...
    pqrwf            |tyu       |<-- other data in record...
    xyzsder          |abc       |<-- other data in record...
    adca             |xyzghrt   |<-- other data in record...
    tyuvdfcg         |pqr       |<-- other data in record...
    abcvfgfaqrt      |pqrbb     |<-- other data in record...
    abcaaaaaaaaaaa   |xyz       |<-- other data in record...

In this case the simple sort still works but note that these columns a padded out with spaces not tabs.

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