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I have read other questions like this but none seemed to work... My code is:

int flowRateFormula(int pipeDiameter,double velocity)
{
int integer3;

integer3=PI*(1/4)*(pow(pipeDiameter,2))*velocity;

return integer3;

 }

And the error is:

flowRate.c: In function ‘flowRateFormula’:
flowRate.c:38:13: error: invalid type argument of unary ‘*’ (have ‘int’)

What to do? BTW PI IS DEFINED

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3  
Is PI defined? I'm betting it's empty. BTW, (1/4) will give you zero, making your whole expression zero. –  Fred Larson Dec 7 '11 at 18:22
4  
Integer division: 1/4... Change it to 1.0/4.0 –  Mysticial Dec 7 '11 at 18:22
    
@FredLarson: I think you are right, It compiles fine for me if PI is defined. –  GWW Dec 7 '11 at 18:22
    
(Unrelated): Either replace (1/4) with 0.25 or (1/4.0). –  Joe Dec 7 '11 at 18:24
    
You are mixing types here, pow returns double. (1/4) with int type == 0. You probably want to do all of your calculation with doubles. –  TJD Dec 7 '11 at 18:24

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Most likely you have the line

#define PI

somewhere, which causes your code to be equivalent to:

integer3=*(1/4)*....

and this fails to compile. Replace it with e.g.

#define PI 3.1416

Note also that (1/4) will be evaluated to 0, because integer division returns an integer. you probably want to use 1.0/4.0.

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Better replace with #define PI (3.1416) –  buddhabrot Dec 7 '11 at 18:28
    
@buddhabrot: That's good practice in general, but I don't think it matters here since it only contains a single number so operator precedence won't be an issue. –  interjay Dec 7 '11 at 18:30

You need to declare a value for PI first.

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Is PI defined? I'm betting it's empty. BTW, (1/4) will give you zero, making your whole expression zero.

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