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Cannot understand why the returned values from the function login bellow do not correspond to what is passed to it.

The following is a snippet of my code

package This_package;
    .......   

    # returned from function that parses post data ($reqparam)
    my $thisuser = $$reqparam{"username"};

    # escape '@', username is an email
    $thisuser =~ s/@/\@/;
    my $thisuser_pass = $$reqparam{'password'};

    print $thisuser;      # ok
    print $thisuser_pass; # ok

    my $obj = new users;
    my $valid_user = $obj->login($thisuser, $thisuser_pass);
    .......

package Another_package;
    sub new {
        my ($class) = @_;
        my $self = {
            _login => undef,
            _create_user => undef,
            ....
            };
        bless $self, $class;
        return $self;
    }

    sub login ($$){
        my ($user, $pass) = @_;
        # some processing
        .....

       return $user;   # prints users=HASH(...)
       # return $pass; # prints the value of $user (the actual value)
                       # instead of the value of $pass
    }

While trying to learn perl by converting some code from php into perl. I have run into this problem, I have tried a few alternatives but obviously there is something I am not getting!

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3 Answers 3

When you call a function like

 my $valid_user = $obj->login($thisuser, $thisuser_pass);

The first parameter is this usually done as

sub login
{
    my ( $self , $user , $password ) = @_;
}

You are missing $self

Because you are missing $self you user is actually the object and your password is actually the user.

If you are coming from another objected oriented language like C++ , Java or C#, this is a perl gotcha (no pun intended :)) . Another one is that even from an object method if you want to invoke another member method you have to use self like

$self->callAnotherObject( $user );

Simply calling wont do

 callAnotherObject( $user );

Also I see that you are using function prototypes, It may not work as you intend it to be.

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+1 for warning about prototypes in Perl –  tadmc Dec 7 '11 at 19:39
1  
Prototypes are completely ignored on method calls (which is why he didn't notice the incorrect prototype). –  cjm Dec 7 '11 at 22:21

When you use object-oriented syntax ($obj->login($thisuser, $thisuser_pass)) to call a subroutine, the first argument will be the object itself. You should say, and you will typically see object-oriented modules use syntax like:

sub login {
    my ($self, $user, $pass) = @_;
    ...
}

Incidentally, you shouldn't use prototypes ( ($$) ) without a good reason. Prototypes in Perl are not used in the same way they are in other languages, and in any case the prototype is ignored when you call a subroutine with indirect syntax (luckily, in your case, since you are actually calling it with 3 arguments).

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I edited and added the prototype stuff not looking at your answer ( I swear :) ) –  parapura rajkumar Dec 7 '11 at 19:18
1  
Nitpick, but $obj->foo isn't indirect syntax, it's just OO method syntax. Indirect method syntax is when you do foo $obj, which of course you should avoid. –  friedo Dec 7 '11 at 19:34
    
thanks friedo - I was confused about that –  mob Dec 7 '11 at 19:44
    
@parapura rajkumar - Great minds think alike. Coincidentally, so do ours. –  mob Dec 7 '11 at 21:17

You even watch Mythbusters?

Although you see Adam and Jamie do really, really dangerous stuff, they warn you at the beginning of every program, "Don't do this at home." Think of Perl prototypes in the same way. If you use them, there's a good likelihood you'll get badly burned.


Okay, now who is calling your login function? Or, maybe better, how is it called?

If I use your Perl module, do I call your login subroutine from my main program like this?

my $package_obj = Another_package->new;
$package_obj->login($user, $password);

Or, is this some subroutine that you use in your package for your convenience and you use it as a simple subroutine, and not a private method like this:

package Another_package;

sub new {
   ...
}

sub foo {
  ...
  my $user = login ($user, $password);
}

If you're calling your login subroutine as a simple subroutine inside your package as in the second example, everything should be fine.

However, if you're treating your login subroutine like a full fledge method (like I do in the first example), you must remember that methods pass their class object as the first parameter of the subroutine.

Thus, you'll need to do something like this:

sub login {
   my $self     = shift;    #Pointer to the Another_package object I'm using
   my $user     = shift;
   my $password = shift;    #I just love lining things up!

   $self->{USER} = $user;   #Bad way of doing it.
   $self->{PASSWD} = $password;
   ...                      #Some processing.

   return $user;
}

Why the #Bad way of doing it comment? Because you really want to keep your internals as separate as possible. That way, if you make a change to the structure of the Another_package class, your changes are isolated in a very specific part of your code. It makes debugging much easier.

A better way of writing the login subroutine would be:

sub Login {                 #In standard Perl, methods are capitalized.
   my $self     = shift;    #Pointer to Another_package object
   my $user     = shift;    #Allow user to pass user and password in constructor
   my $password = shift;    #I just love lining things up!

   $self->User($user);      #Way better: This is a setter/getter method
   $self->Password($password);
   ...                      #Some processing.

   return $user;
}

In this example, I'm using setter/getter methods for setting my user name and password. This way, I don't have to worry how they're actually stored in my object.

Here's your Another_Package module using setter/getter methods. I now allow the user to pass in the user and password when they call the new constructor if they'd like.

package Another_package;

    sub new {
        my $class = shift;
        my $user  = shift;
        my $password = shift;

        my $self = {};
        bless $self, $class;

        $self->User($user);
        $self->Password($password);
        ...
        return $self;
    }

    sub Login {
        my $self = shift;
        my $user = shift;
        my $pass = shift;

        $self->Password($pass);
        if (not defined $self->User($user)) {
           croak qq(Cannot log in without a user ID);
        }

        ...
        if ($login_successful) {
           return $self->User;    #Or maybe a session instant
        else {
           return;
        }
    }

Notice in my new constructor subroutine I create a $self anonymous hash (my $self = {}) and I immediately bless it. Now, $self is already a package object, and I can call a bunch of setter/getter methods to set the various fields in my object. My new constructor has no idea what my actual Another_module object looks like.

In my Login method subroutine, I also use the same setter/getter methods to set user and password. Again, my Login method knows nothing on how these fields are stored in the object.

One more thing you might notice is that I'm setting a scalar called $login_successful in my Login module to see whether or not my login was successful. In Perl, it is common to return nothing if the method fails, or return something on success. This way, the user's program can test to see if the call succeeded or failed. For example, maybe if the login fails, the user might want to try some default passwords before giving up:

 my $package_obj = Another_package->new($user, $password);

 my $foo = $package_obj->Login;
 if (not defined $foo) {
     foreach my $password qw(swordfish s3x mon3y 7ucky) {
        $package_obj->Password($password);
        last if $foo = $package_obj->Login;
     }
     if (not defined $foo) {
        die "I don't know the password :-(";
     }
 }

So, what do my setter/getter methods look like? They're actually pretty simple:

sub User {
    my $self = shift;
    my $user = shift;

    if(defined $user) {
         $self->{USER_INFO}->{USER} = $user;
    }
    return $self->{USER_INFO}->{USER};
}

sub Password {
    my $self = shift;
    my $pass = shift;
    if (defined $password) {
        $self->{USER_INFO}->{PASSWORD} = $pass;
    }
    return $self->{USER_INFO}->{PASSWORD};
}

Why do I store $user in $self->{USER_INFO}->{USER} and not $self->{USER}? No reason a at all. However, it does show that the rest of the Another_package module doesn't care where or how I store the user and password.

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I got the answer to my question, it solves the problem. I am still building the code, the login function the way I have it so far only does some database checking for username and password and if correct creates some session variables, and returns 1 or 0. It is called from the main program like your first example. –  jose antunes Dec 7 '11 at 23:37

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