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I have a JSON object:

 var json = {"Mike":1, "Jake":1, "Henry":1};

I am trying to loop through this list to access the names. Currently I am using:

for (var name in json) {
    if (json.hasOwnProperty(name)) {
        console.log(name);
    }
}

But it's not printing the name. Is that the correct way to do it?

jsFiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/bKwYq/

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7  
Working for me, code looks fine. You realize console.log() prints to a debugger console and not to your page, yes? –  Interrobang Dec 7 '11 at 19:49
2  
This works me and prints the name correctly. –  Amir Raminfar Dec 7 '11 at 19:49
1  
Note that there is no JSON here whatsoever. JSON is a text-based data format that is based on, is named after and looks like this fundamental syntax of Javascript that you're using, which could be called Object Notation. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Dec 7 '11 at 20:03
1  
which browser & version? –  Triptych Dec 7 '11 at 20:04
2  
Side note: that is not a JSON object; that is a JavaScript object literal. A JSON object would look like: var json = '{"Mike":1, "Jake":1, "Henry":1}'; –  Phrogz Dec 7 '11 at 20:04

2 Answers 2

The correct way to PRINT the name is to use document.write instead of console.log, as in this fiddle :

http://jsfiddle.net/jRAna/

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console.log is actually a nicer way to debug rather than printing to the page –  TS- Dec 7 '11 at 21:21
    
wow so much hatred simply by responding to the actual question. Never said it was better to print it, just answered what was asked. –  Dominic Goulet Dec 7 '11 at 23:59

As other people mentioned, this is not JSON, it's just an object.

The hasOwnProperty thing may not really be necessary here also.

var persons = {"Mike":1, "Jake":1, "Henry":1};
for (var name in persons) {
    alert(name);
}

This will work in every browser: http://jsfiddle.net/HsNMY/

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It will not work as intended if you add Object.prototype.foo = 42 before your loop. This is why hasOwnProperty is recommended. –  Phrogz Dec 7 '11 at 21:00
    
it's super recommended to not add anything to Object.prototype.foo, so all major libraries don't. –  Jamund Ferguson Dec 7 '11 at 21:23
    
While I know that some major libraries forbid it (because they don't want to add hasOwnProperty in all their enumerations due to the speed hit), I'd like you to provide a citation for "super recommended". –  Phrogz Dec 7 '11 at 21:26
    
stackoverflow.com/questions/6877005/… javascriptweblog.wordpress.com/2011/12/05/… erik.eae.net/archives/2005/06/06/22.13.54 Extending natives I think is cool though, just not Object.prototype. This is great talk about it: blip.tv/jsconf/… –  Jamund Ferguson Dec 7 '11 at 21:33
    
Thanks. FWIW I personally find only the second URL convincing; the first is just a random opinion, and the third appears to be written by someone who clearly didn't understand how to write JavaScript code. Still, you have provided a citation as asked. :) –  Phrogz Dec 7 '11 at 21:36

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