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I am new to C++ in general so excuse me if I am overlooking something obvious.

I have a class with a std::vector data member e.g.

foo{
public:

const std::vector<int> getVec(){return myVec;} //other stuff omitted

private:
std::vector<int> myVec;

};

Now at some part of my main code I am trying to iterate through the vector like this:

std::vector<int>::const_iterator i = myFoo.getVec().begin();
while( i != myFoo.getVec().end())
{
   //do stuff
   ++i;
}

Now the moment I reach this loop, I get the aforementioned error. I don't understand what's going on. Any help is appreciated!

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5  
You are returning a copy of the vector, probably you want to return a const std::vector<int>& –  AraK Dec 7 '11 at 19:55
    
Do you really want to return a copy of your vector? –  celtschk Dec 7 '11 at 19:56
    
There is no "aforementioned error". You never gave it to us. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Dec 7 '11 at 19:56
2  
Please don't return const values from functions, as it inhibits C++11 move semantics. –  ildjarn Dec 7 '11 at 19:58
1  
@TomalakGeret'kal the error is aforementioned in the title I presume. –  Seth Carnegie Dec 7 '11 at 20:00

8 Answers 8

up vote 33 down vote accepted

The reason you are getting this, is that the iterators are from two (or more) different copies of myVec. You are returning a copy of the vector with each call to myFoo.getVec(). So the iterators are incompatible.

Some solutions:

Return a const reference to the std::vector<int> :

const std::vector<int> & getVec(){return myVec;} //other stuff omitted

Another solution, probably preferable would be to get a local copy of the vector and use this to get your iterators:

const std::vector<int> myCopy = myFoo.getVec();
std::vector<int>::const_iterator i = myCopy.begin();
while(i != myCopy.end())
{
  //do stuff
  ++i;
}

Also +1 for not using namespace std;

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You are returning a copy of the vector. Because you are returning by value - your call to begin() and end() are for completely different vectors. You need to return a const & to it.

const std::vector<int> &getVec(){return myVec;}

I would do this slightly differently though. I'd make the class act a little like a standard container

class Data
{
   public:
      typedef std::vector<int>::const_iterator const_iterator;

      const_iterator begin() const { return myVec.begin(); }
      const_iterator end() const { return myVec.end(); }
};

Data::const_iterator i=myFoo.begin();

while(i != myFoo.end())
{
//
}
share|improve this answer
    
great answer. thanks –  rank1 May 24 '13 at 9:14

The problem is that you always return another copy of the vector. Use a reference:

const std::vector<int>& getVec(){return myVec;} //other stuff omitted
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You are making a constant copy of the member vector, not accessing the member vector.

Change this:

const std::vector<int> getVec(){return myVec;} //other stuff omitted

to this:

const std::vector<int> & getVec(){return myVec;} //other stuff omitted

To go a little deeper, the iterator you get from this statement:

std::vector<int>::const_iterator i = myFoo.getVec().begin();

is an iterator to the temporary copy of your vector, which goes away after that statement executes, invalidating the iterator.

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Slightly off-topic, but your for loop to do stuff should be in a member method of class foo. You generally shouldn't have things outside a class operating on the internal data of a class. –  Rob K Dec 7 '11 at 20:01
1  
And it's an invalidate iterator for a different container. Two problems. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Dec 7 '11 at 20:02

Change

const std::vector<int> getVec(){return myVec;}

to

const std::vector<int>& getVec(){return myVec;}
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well, I don't think vector copy could be the only cause, that seems to be too obivious to me.

in my case I just find that corrupted stack, heap, uninteneded changes could also result in this failure, and it will in fact hiding the underlying reason. in my case, I changed to use indexer to iterate through and find the root cause.

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Another reason why this assert can trigger is if you would allocate "foo" with 'malloc' instead of 'new', effectively skipping the constructor(s).

It's unlikely to happen to a project developed from scratch in C++, but when converting plain-C code to C++ (replacing a static array[] in some struct with an stl-vector) you might just not realise that dynamic instances of said struct (and the members inside) are not going to have their constructor called - unless you also change 'malloc' to 'new'.

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Your getVec() function returns a deep copy of the member vector, so the two getVec() calls you make to retrieve iterators get iterators to different containers. That is, you can't reach getVec().end() from a separate getVec().begin() iterator without invoking undefined behavior.

You can solve this in two ways:

1) Have getVec return a const reference (that is, const std::vector&) (preferred) or...

2) Replace the two getVec() calls with one and save the result to a std::vector variable. Then, use that variable for both calls to begin() and end(). E.g:

std::vector<int> v = myFoo.getVec();
std::vector<int>::const_iterator b = v.begin();
std::vector<int>::const_iterator e = v.end();
share|improve this answer
    
See Adrian Cornish's answer for an even better solution... –  Drew Hall Dec 7 '11 at 20:01

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