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I just have a question about my cuda program that I wrote. It allows me to enter the size of the matrix, col and rows. Say I enter ~1124 and it computes fine. However say I enter 1149 it Seg faults AFTER computing in the device(I think it's seg faulting during the copy back). But say I enter 2000 it seg faults BEFORE computing in the device(I think it seg faults during the copy over). I think my issue is all with memory management. If you guys could point me in the right direction I'd appreciate it.

I udpated the code with how it is called. In the new edit(at the bottom) it contains: sumMatrix(blank matrix with the size of eleCount1, which is the size of the entire matrix), matrixOne(first matrix),matrixTwo(second matrix, allocated same way matrix1 is done),eleCount1(entire size of matrix). Both matrixOne and two are read in from a file.

Wasn't sure if someone needed to see this stuff about my GPU:

  • Total amount of constant memory: 65536 bytes
  • Total amount of shared memory per block: 49152 bytes
  • Total number of registers available per block: 32768
  • Warp size: 32
  • Maximum number of threads per block: 1024
  • Maximum sizes of each dimension of a block: 1024 x 1024 x 64
  • Maximum sizes of each dimension of a grid: 65535 x 65535 x 65535

The code is:

void addKernel(float *c, float *a, float *b)
{
    int i = threadIdx.x;
    int idx = blockDim.x * blockIdx.x + threadIdx.x;
    c[idx] = a[idx] + b[idx];
}
cudaError_t addWithCuda(float *c, float *a, float *b, size_t size)
{
  float *dev_a = 0;
  float *dev_b = 0;
  float *dev_c = 0;
  cudaError_t cudaStatus;
  blocksNeeded=(size/MAXTHREADS)+1;
  int threadsPerBlock = MAXTHREADS/blocksNeeded+1;
  cudaStatus = cudaMalloc((void**)&dev_c, size * sizeof(float));
  if (cudaStatus != cudaSuccess) {
      fprintf(stderr, "cudaMalloc failed!");
      goto Error;
  }

  cudaStatus = cudaMalloc((void**)&dev_a, size * sizeof(float));
  if (cudaStatus != cudaSuccess) {
      fprintf(stderr, "cudaMalloc failed!");
      goto Error;
  }

  cudaStatus = cudaMalloc((void**)&dev_b, size * sizeof(float));
  if (cudaStatus != cudaSuccess) {
      fprintf(stderr, "cudaMalloc failed!");
      goto Error;
  }

  cudaStatus = cudaMemcpy(dev_a, a, size * sizeof(float), cudaMemcpyHostToDevice);
  if (cudaStatus != cudaSuccess) {
      fprintf(stderr, "cudaMemcpy failed!");
      goto Error;
  }

  cudaStatus = cudaMemcpy(dev_b, b, size * sizeof(float), cudaMemcpyHostToDevice);
  if (cudaStatus != cudaSuccess) {
      fprintf(stderr, "cudaMemcpy failed!");
      goto Error;
  }

  addKernel<<<blocksNeeded, size>>>(dev_c, dev_a, dev_b);
  cudaStatus = cudaDeviceSynchronize();

  if (cudaStatus != cudaSuccess) {
      fprintf(stderr, "cudaDeviceSynchronize returned error code %d after launching addKernel!\n", cudaStatus);
      goto Error;
  }
  cudaStatus = cudaMemcpy(c, dev_c, size * sizeof(float), cudaMemcpyDeviceToHost);
  if (cudaStatus != cudaSuccess) {
      fprintf(stderr, "cudaMemcpy failed!");
      goto Error;
  }

Error:
  cudaFree(dev_c);
  cudaFree(dev_a);
  cudaFree(dev_b);

  return cudaStatus;
}
//edit: added how the matrix are allocated
    float* matrixOne = (float*)malloc(sizeof(float)*file1size);
int matrixIndex = 0;
readFromFile(fd,byte, matrixOneWidth, matrixOneHeight,  matrixOne);

//matrixOneHeight--;
eleCount1 = matrixOneHeight*matrixOneWidth;
matrixOne= (float*)realloc(matrixOne,eleCount1*sizeof(float));
//Edit: Added how the addWithCuda is called.
cudaStatus = addWithCuda(sumMatrix, matrixOne,matrixTwo,eleCount1);
//sumMatrix is created after we know how large the matrices are. 
float sumMatrix[eleCount1];
share|improve this question
2  
it is most probably an error with a, b or c, but we don't get to see where they are allocated or how you are calling addWithCuda. –  talonmies Dec 7 '11 at 20:41
    
I updated with how it's being called. Let me know if I should put more up for you to take a look at. Thanks! –  Dan Dec 8 '11 at 14:29
1  
where does file1size came from? i'll bet some rep that the heap corruption has something to do with the readFromeFile(...) function. –  kronos Dec 8 '11 at 14:58
    
Can you edit this into a compileable, runnable repro case? The edits you have made are in a nonsensical order and there is still a lot of undefined stuff, without which it will be impossible to say what is going wrong in your host code because this is 99.9999% certain a problem that has nothing to do with CUDA. –  talonmies Dec 8 '11 at 15:36
1  
The CUDA compiler won't let you invoke a kernel that is not declared __global__. You should at least fix that... –  harrism Dec 9 '11 at 2:49

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You are not testing the bounds of your computation inside the kernel. If the total amount of work does not evenly divide to the size of a block, some threads will try to write to indices that are outside the output array. I suggest you also pass the size as a parameter to the kernel and introduce the check:

__global__ void addKernel(float *c, float *a, float *b, int size)
{
    int i = threadIdx.x;
    int idx = blockDim.x * blockIdx.x + threadIdx.x;
    if(idx < size) c[idx] = a[idx] + b[idx];
}
share|improve this answer
1  
That won't cause a host segfault, which is what is being reported. –  talonmies Dec 7 '11 at 20:39
    
He said the segfault happens in random places. Anyway, it's worth to try this, because it is generally a cause for segfaults in cuda programs. –  Tudor Dec 7 '11 at 21:12
3  
Sorry, but it doesn't. A memory violation in the GPU generates a CUDA runtime error - usually an unspecified launch error - but it will not generate a host memory protection error. If he is getting a segfault it means doing something illegal in host memory. –  talonmies Dec 7 '11 at 21:37
1  
talonmies is right on that. CUDA has a relaxed memory organisation where you almoust can do what you want on the GPU memory. Worst what can happen is, as mentioned an unspcified launch error. Witch can be detected running cuda-memcheck. The segfault on a random place is most likely a corrupted heap. –  kronos Dec 8 '11 at 10:24
    
So what I'm understanding from this is that it's a host issue and not a CUDA mem issue? I have also updated the code to where I call <<<>>> i have blocks needed and threads needed. I updated the code to reflect that I did that, but does it still matter? As of right nnow, I have 1024 threads per block. Say I run a matrices size of 1025, it will comput 1024 threads on the first block and 1 on the second block. Should I not be doing this? –  Dan Dec 8 '11 at 14:34

I see that you are indexing into arrays a, b and c in your kernel, but you do not check to make sure that the index is within the array bounds. You are therefore writing into memory that you do not own, causing seg faults in random places.

share|improve this answer
1  
That would cause a GPU unspecified launch failure error from the kernel laumch, not a host segfault. –  talonmies Dec 7 '11 at 20:42

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