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I've been trying for two days now to pass an array into a setTimeout callback.

I've been looking all over the internet, and I've read maybe 10 different StackOverflow questions with all their answers. I must be missing something because after trying all of these different things it still doesn't work. Here is where I stand right now:

function testing(pixels){    

        return function(){
          for(i=0; i<pixels.length;i++){
                a = pixels[i][0];
                b = pixels[i][1];
                c = pixels[i][2];
                d = pixels[i][3];
                box = pixels[i][5];
                done = pixels[i][6];


                color_to_draw = done ? box.color:active_color;
                ctx.fillRect(a,b,c,d);        
                ctx2.clearRect(box.x-1,box.y-1,box.w,box.h);
                draw_colored_box(box.x, box.y, box.w, box.h, color_to_draw, box.alpha, true, ctx2);
            }
        };

}

function ias(pixel_batch){
  var color_to_draw; 
    ctx.fillStyle = "#000000";
    var a, b, c, d, e, box, done, i;


        setTimeout(testing(pixel_batch),pixel_batch[0][4]);
}

I've gotten out of all the different solutions I found that my method here should work. I am clearly doing something wrong, as it DOES NOT work.

The problem is that, in the function ias(), pixel_batch.length is equal to 3, or however many items get put into that array, even in the function testing(), pixels.length is the correct value, but inside the function RETURNED by testing, pixels.length` is equal to 0...

Originally, this is what I had tried:

function ias(pixel_batch){
  var color_to_draw; 
    ctx.fillStyle = "#000000";
    var a, b, c, d, e, box, done, i;


        setTimeout((function(pixels){
            console.log(pixels.length);

            return function(){

              for(i=0; i<pixels.length;i++){
                    a = pixels[i][0];
                    b = pixels[i][1];
                    c = pixels[i][2];
                    d = pixels[i][3];
                    box = pixels[i][5];
                    done = pixels[i][6];


                    color_to_draw = done ? box.color:active_color;
                    ctx.fillRect(a,b,c,d);        
                    ctx2.clearRect(box.x-1,box.y-1,box.w,box.h);
                    draw_colored_box(box.x, box.y, box.w, box.h, color_to_draw, box.alpha, true, ctx2);
                }
            };
        })(pixel_batch),pixel_batch[0][4]);
}

As believe it does not need to be done through an externally defined function, but at this point I've started trying anything/everything.

How can I get pixel_batch (the parameter passed to ias()) into the callback for setTimeout?

[EDIT/UPDATE] Here is the code that actually CALLS ias():

function redraw_boxes(){

    //This loop simply draws the active boxes again, on top of the previous set.
    //At this point in time there is no need to clear the canvas at all.
    var i; var i2; var box;
    var temp_pixelation_array = pixelation_array.slice(0);
    var x_mod; var y_mod; 
    var random_array_key;
    var max_runs;
    var the_pixel_batch = [];
    var num_pixels_per_batch = 3;
    var speed_to_pixelate = 3;
    var done;
    var temptimer=0;
    var timers = [];
    for(i=0;i<newly_acquired_boxes.length;i++){    
    temptimer=0;

    temp_pixelation_array = pixelation_array.slice(0);
        max_runs = temp_pixelation_array.length;
            box = boxes[newly_acquired_boxes[i].column][newly_acquired_boxes[i].row];

        for(i2 = 0; i2<max_runs;i2++){

           random_array_key = ~~((Math.random()*temp_pixelation_array.length));

            x_mod = temp_pixelation_array[random_array_key][0];
            y_mod = temp_pixelation_array[random_array_key][1];
            temp_pixelation_array.splice(random_array_key,1);

            done = i2<max_runs-1 ? true:true ; 
            the_pixel_batch.push([box.x+x_mod, box.y+y_mod, particle_size, particle_size,temptimer,box,done]);
            if(the_pixel_batch.length>= num_pixels_per_batch){                
                ias(the_pixel_batch);
                the_pixel_batch.length = 0;
                temptimer += num_pixels_per_batch*speed_to_pixelate;
            }




        }






    }
    newly_acquired_boxes.length=0;


}

[2 EDIT/UPDATE 2]

I wish I could accept all your answers, as you were all technically right. It's my fault for not giving you the right information to begin with. I up voted everyone because you all deserved the answer, you just couldn't give it to me with the information provided.

share|improve this question
    
At a very quick first glance, your approach seems sound at least –  Lightness Races in Orbit Dec 7 '11 at 20:00
    
I think we'd need to see some data so we can test. I don't really see why you're invoking a function that returns a function in the first place. There's only one setTimeout being invoked in ias, so the callback has exclusive access to the values of the variables for that function invocation. –  RightSaidFred Dec 7 '11 at 20:15
    
Breaking down your function into it's basic parts, it seems to work: jsfiddle.net/pxaXq –  gilly3 Dec 7 '11 at 20:16
    
I'm only using the function that returns a function because I've been driven to try everything. Originally I just defined the function inside the setTimeout –  BumbleShrimp Dec 7 '11 at 20:21
    
@JonathonG: Is there anything left out of this function? Or does any other code have access to the pixels Array that could clear it before the setTimeout happens. There's something we're missing here. –  RightSaidFred Dec 7 '11 at 20:25
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4 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Your problem is right here:

ias(the_pixel_batch);
the_pixel_batch.length = 0;

You're clearing the Array before the setTimeout runs.


You should do:

pixel_batch.length = 0;

...in the setTimeout callback.

function ias(pixel_batch) {
    ctx.fillStyle = "#000000";

    setTimeout(function () {
        var color_to_draw, a, b, c, d, e, box, done, i;

        for (i = 0; i < pixels.length; i++) {
            a = pixels[i][0];
            b = pixels[i][1];
            c = pixels[i][2];
            d = pixels[i][3];
            box = pixels[i][5];
            done = pixels[i][6];

            color_to_draw = done ? box.color : active_color;
            ctx.fillRect(a, b, c, d);
            ctx2.clearRect(box.x - 1, box.y - 1, box.w, box.h);
            draw_colored_box(box.x, box.y, box.w, box.h, color_to_draw, box.alpha, true, ctx2);
        }
        pixel_batch.length = 0; // <<--- RIGHT HERE
    }, pixel_batch[0][4]);
}
share|improve this answer
    
I thought it was being copied to the varialbe pixel_batch inside the ias() function, that's why I assumed this wasn't the problem. –  BumbleShrimp Dec 7 '11 at 20:29
    
I can't believe that I have already had this problem once, and now I have it again. the solution is to do pixel_batch = pixel_batch.slice(0); at the beginning of ias()...... –  BumbleShrimp Dec 7 '11 at 20:30
    
@JonathonG: Yes, to make a shallow copy, you'd need .slice(), or just skip the slice, and clear the Array in the callback. But yeah, it's a pointer to the same array that is passed to the function. –  RightSaidFred Dec 7 '11 at 20:32
    
I can't clear the array in the callback because the ias function gets run anywhere from 30 to 300 times before the first setTimeout even executes. –  BumbleShrimp Dec 7 '11 at 20:34
    
and each time the setTimeout callback runs, it needs to have 3 different pixels in the array. I suppose I could use some kind of offset passed in to modify i, but is there any disadvantage to using the slice(0) method? –  BumbleShrimp Dec 7 '11 at 20:35
show 4 more comments

Are you modifying the pixel_batch array after calling ias() but before the timeout has executed? If so, you could pass a copy of the array:

setTimeout(testing(pixel_batch.slice(0)),pixel_batch[0][4]);

(Noting that .slice() only makes a one-level deep copy of the array...)

share|improve this answer
add comment

Expanding on David's answer: I think what you may want is something like this:

function draw () {
      for(i=0; i<pixels.length;i++){
            a = pixels[i][0];
            b = pixels[i][1];
            c = pixels[i][2];
            d = pixels[i][3];
            box = pixels[i][5];
            done = pixels[i][6];


            color_to_draw = done ? box.color:active_color;
            ctx.fillRect(a,b,c,d);        
            ctx2.clearRect(box.x-1,box.y-1,box.w,box.h);
            draw_colored_box(box.x, box.y, box.w, box.h, color_to_draw, box.alpha, true, ctx2);
        }
    }

function ias(pixel_batch){
  var color_to_draw; 
    ctx.fillStyle = "#000000";
    var a, b, c, d, e, box, done, i;
    setTimeout(function () {draw(pixel_batch)},pixel_batch[0][4]);
}

There is no need for a function that returns a function, you can just use a closure to call the function directly.

share|improve this answer
    
Either this, or closing on the argument to the function by creating an in-scope copy as in my answer, should both work. –  Tetsujin no Oni Dec 7 '11 at 20:19
    
Then it seems like the problem must be somewhere else. Would it matter that the function that calls ias(the_pixel_batch) resets the_pixel_batch[] to 0 length after making the call? –  BumbleShrimp Dec 7 '11 at 20:23
    
Yes, because even my copy strategy was only copying the reference not copying the array. –  Tetsujin no Oni Dec 7 '11 at 20:25
add comment

Here a good article explaining how to do this : http://www.makemineatriple.com/2007/10/passing-parameters-to-a-function-called-with-settimeout

Here is the conclusion : setTimeout(function(){myFunction(parameter)}, myTimeout);

share|improve this answer
    
i've tried this, to no avail. for some reason the array being passed in still has 0 length when I try to access it inside the callback function –  BumbleShrimp Dec 7 '11 at 20:08
2  
I think the code is calling a function returned by testing(), so calling testing(...) directly in the setTimeout (rather than in a closure) is correct. –  mattwigway Dec 7 '11 at 20:09
1  
Your anonymous function is failing to close on the argument - when setTimeout actually applies your function, it has no defined variable pixels in its scope. David's answer sums up what my response was going to be, without going into the details of other approaches to fixing it. –  Tetsujin no Oni Dec 7 '11 at 20:09
    
@TetsujinnoOni: It has the formal parameter pixels, no? setTimeout((function(pixels){ –  RightSaidFred Dec 7 '11 at 20:18
    
If it closed on the formal parameter, it would work as he has it... –  Tetsujin no Oni Dec 7 '11 at 20:19
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