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My .gitignore file seems to be working unpredictably. Here is an example:

I make a new repo foo with a file bar.txt, which I want to ignore:

pon2@kann4:~$ mkdir foo
pon2@kann4:~$ cd foo/
pon2@kann4:~/foo$ touch bar.txt
pon2@kann4:~/foo$ git init
Initialized empty Git repository in /home/pon2/foo/.git/
pon2@kann4:~/foo$ git status
# On branch master
#
# Initial commit
#
# Untracked files:
#   (use "git add <file>..." to include in what will be committed)
#
#       bar.txt
nothing added to commit but untracked files present (use "git add" to track)

As expected, bar.txt shows up as untracked. So I tell git to ignore .txts, but I accidentally add some trailing whitespace:

pon2@kann4:~/foo$ echo "*.txt " > .gitignore

Now when I check the repo status, git doesn't ignore bar.txt:

pon2@kann4:~/foo$ git status
# On branch master
#
# Initial commit
#
# Untracked files:
#   (use "git add <file>..." to include in what will be committed)
#
#       .gitignore
#       bar.txt
nothing added to commit but untracked files present (use "git add" to track)

What's going on?

share|improve this question
    
It's okay to ask and answer your own question, as long as you phrase your question in the form of a question: meta.stackexchange.com/questions/12513/… Otherwise, this is just a blog post and doesn't belong here. –  Greg Hewgill Dec 7 '11 at 20:35
1  
So send a patch calling this out in the gitignore man page to the Git developers. –  jamessan Dec 7 '11 at 20:36
    
@GregHewgill, thanks, fixed. –  wvoq Dec 7 '11 at 20:59
1  
Looks great, I've voted to reopen. –  Greg Hewgill Dec 7 '11 at 21:00
    
Thanks, much obliged. –  wvoq Dec 7 '11 at 23:13

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

.gitignore is whitespace sensitive. If you include trailing whitespace, git won't recognize your files.

In this line there's a trailing space:

pon2@kann4:~/foo$ echo "*.txt " > .gitignore

Once we fix that:

pon2@kann4:~/foo$ echo "*.txt" > .gitignore

The issue resolves:

pon2@kann4:~/foo$ git status
# On branch master
#
# Initial commit
#
# Untracked files:
#   (use "git add <file>..." to include in what will be committed)
#
#       .gitignore
nothing added to commit but untracked files present (use "git add" to track)
pon2@kann4:~/foo$ 
share|improve this answer
1  
I created a file: "b.txt " and your origin .gitignore ignored this file correctly. If you were expecting something different, What exactly were you expecting? –  Charles Bailey Dec 7 '11 at 21:39
    
@CharlesBailey, filenames with trailing whitespace seem like a kind of pathological edge case. I expect that if I accidentally put trailing whitespace in my .gitignore, git will do the right thing and ignore it. Whether that is the Right Thing in your view is up to you, but I hope you can at least appreciate that it's very confusing behavior. I didn't see any documentation of this, so I put it up on SO as a breadcrumb for anyone who was as confused as I was. –  wvoq Dec 7 '11 at 22:32
    
I'd agree the filenames with whitespace are usually best avoided, but if someone wants to explicitly ignore them it should be allowed. If you want to sanity check changes to your .gitignore you should consider using git diff --check before commiting. (Or git log -p --check to find possible bad previous revisions.) –  Charles Bailey Dec 7 '11 at 22:39
    
I'm not saying that git shouldn't let you do crazy things. I'm just suggesting that, when faced with an instruction that is either explicitly a crazy thing, or a common way to type a sensible thing, that the assumption default to the sensible thing. As you probably noticed with your "b.txt " example, you have to go out of your way to specify the trailing space. The Bash shell, for example, requires either quotes or a backslash, otherwise it chomps the space. Wouldn't it make sense for git to have the same default? –  wvoq Dec 7 '11 at 23:12
    
imo, (and quoting here...) ..."Explicit is better than implicit."... I'd rather explicitly say which files i want ignored than having having git automatically stripping whitespace. goo.gl/ar3CJ –  g19fanatic Dec 8 '11 at 18:03

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