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Does anyone know what the mechanism is that the R randomForest package uses to resolve classification ties - i.e. when the trees end up with equal votes in two or more classes?

The documentation says that the tie is broken randomly. However, when you train a model on a set of data and then score that model many times with a single set of validation data, the tied class decisions aren't 50/50.

cnum = vector("integer",1000)
for (i in 1:length(cnum)){
  cnum[i] = (as.integer(predict(model,val_x[bad_ind[[1]],])))
}
cls = unique(cnum)
for (i in 1:length(cls)){
  print(length(which(cnum == cls[i])))
}

where model is the randomForest object and bad_ind is just a list of indices for feature vectors that have tied class votes. In my test cases, using the code above, the distribution between two tied classes is closer to 90/10.

Also, the recommendation to use an odd number of trees doesn't normally work with a third class pulling some votes leaving two other classes in a tie.

Shouldn't these cases with the rf trees tied in voting end up 50/50?

Update: It is difficult to provide an example due to the random nature of training a forest, but the following code (sorry for the slop) should end up producing examples that the forest can't determine a clear winner with. My test runs shows a 66%/33% distribution when the ties are broken - I expected this to be 50%/50%.

library(randomForest)
x1 = runif(200,-4,4)
x2 = runif(200,-4,4)
x3 = runif(1000,-4,4)
x4 = runif(1000,-4,4)
y1 = dnorm(x1,mean=0,sd=1)
y2 = dnorm(x2,mean=0,sd=1)
y3 = dnorm(x3,mean=0,sd=1)
y4 = dnorm(x4,mean=0,sd=1)
train = data.frame("v1"=y1,"v2"=y2)
val = data.frame("v1"=y3,"v2"=y4)
tlab = vector("integer",length(y1))
tlab_ind = sample(1:length(y1),length(y1)/2)
tlab[tlab_ind]= 1
tlab[-tlab_ind] = 2
tlabf = factor(tlab)
vlab = vector("integer",length(y3))
vlab_ind = sample(1:length(y3),length(y3)/2)
vlab[vlab_ind]= 1
vlab[-vlab_ind] = 2
vlabf = factor(vlab)
mm <- randomForest(x=train,y=tlabf,ntree=100)
out1 <- predict(mm,val)
out2 <- predict(mm,val)
out3 <- predict(mm,val)
outv1 <- predict(mm,val,norm.votes=FALSE,type="vote")
outv2 <- predict(mm,val,norm.votes=FALSE,type="vote")
outv3 <- predict(mm,val,norm.votes=FALSE,type="vote")

(max(as.integer(out1)-as.integer(out2)));(min(as.integer(out1)-as.integer(out2)))
(max(as.integer(out2)-as.integer(out3)));(min(as.integer(out2)-as.integer(out3)))
(max(as.integer(out1)-as.integer(out3)));(min(as.integer(out1)-as.integer(out3)))

bad_ind = vector("list",0)
for (i in 1:length(out1)) {
#for (i in 1:100) {
  if (out1[[i]] != out2[[i]]){
    print(paste(i,out1[[i]],out2[[i]],sep = ";    "))
    bad_ind = append(bad_ind,i)
  }
}

for (j in 1:length(bad_ind)) {
  cnum = vector("integer",1000)
  for (i in 1:length(cnum)) {
    cnum[[i]] = as.integer(predict(mm,val[bad_ind[[j]],]))
  }
  cls = unique(cnum)
  perc_vals = vector("integer",length(cls))
  for (i in 1:length(cls)){
    perc_vals[[i]] = length(which(cnum == cls[i]))
  }
  cat("for feature vector ",bad_ind[[j]]," the class distrbution is: ",perc_vals[[1]]/sum(perc_vals),"/",perc_vals[[2]]/sum(perc_vals),"\n")
}

Update: This should be fixed in version 4.6-3 of randomForest.

share|improve this question
    
Can you provide a small reproducible example that demonstrates this behavior? –  joran Dec 7 '11 at 20:59
    
Last part of code has an error somewhere, after bad_ind line... –  Benjamin Dec 8 '11 at 13:43
    
Can you tell me where the bug is? I did just add the library(randomForest) line (at the top), but cutting and pasting the code runs top to bottom on a new instance of R for me. –  Nate Dec 8 '11 at 17:37
    
Just mac / indenting / line return stuff. –  Benjamin Dec 9 '11 at 4:44
    
Please post an answer here if you ever find an explanation... –  Benjamin Dec 12 '11 at 20:10
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3 Answers 3

Without a full example, it is hard to tell if this is the only thing wrong, but one clear issue with the code you included above is that you're not replicating the model-fitting step - only the prediction step. The choice of arbitrary tie-breaking is done when you fit the model, so if you don't redo that part, your predict() calls will keep giving the same class the higher probability/votes.

Try this example, instead, which correctly demonstrates your desired behavior:

library(randomForest)
df = data.frame(class=factor(rep(1:2, each=5)), X1=rep(c(1,3), each=5), X2=rep(c(2,3), each=5))
fitTie <- function(df) {
  df.rf <- randomForest(class ~ ., data=df)
  predict(df.rf, newdata=data.frame(X1=1, X2=3), type='vote')[1]
}
> df
   class X1 X2
1      1  1  2
2      1  1  2
3      1  1  2
4      1  1  2
5      1  1  2
6      2  3  3
7      2  3  3
8      2  3  3
9      2  3  3
10     2  3  3

> mean(replicate(10000, fitTie(df)))
[1] 0.49989
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the response, but I think we're talking about two different distributions. I am intentionally not retraining the rf model. A rf is, by definition, not deterministic. However, the resulting model should be fully deterministic - with the exception of the cases where the random forest has no clear winner. This is the case that I'm interested in. The randomForest documentation says this case is handled by selecting randomly. Assuming this is a uniform distribution, it should end up 50/50. The way this case is handled can, in some experiments, affect the resulting accuracy. –  Nate Dec 8 '11 at 0:05
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I think this is happening because you have such a small number of ties. Same problem as flipping a coin 10 times, you are not guaranteed to wind up at 5 heads 5 tails.

In case 1 below, ties are broken evenly, 1:1 to each class. In case 2, 3:6.

> out1[out1 != out2]
 52 109 144 197 314 609 939 950 
  2   2   1   2   2   1   1   1 

> out1[out1 != out3]
 52 144 146 253 314 479 609 841 939 
  2   1   2   2   2   2   1   2   1 

Changing to a bigger dataset:

x1 = runif(2000,-4,4)
x2 = runif(2000,-4,4)
x3 = runif(10000,-4,4)
x4 = runif(10000,-4,4)

I get:

> sum(out1[out1 != out2] == 1)
[1] 39
> sum(out1[out1 != out2] == 2)
[1] 41

and

> sum(out1[out1 != out3] == 1)
[1] 30
> sum(out1[out1 != out3] == 2)
[1] 31

as expected, unless I misunderstand your code.


EDIT

Oh, I see. You are re-running the cases which had ties, and are expecting them to be broken 50/50, that is: sum(cnum == 1) approximately equal to sum(cnum == 2). You can test much faster by using this approach:

> for (j in 1:length(bad_ind)) {
+   mydata= data.frame("v1"=0, "v2"=0)
+   mydata[rep(1:1000000),] = val[bad_ind[[j]],]
+   outpred = predict(mm,mydata)
+   print(sum(outpred==1) / sum(outpred==2))
+ }
[1] 0.5007849
[1] 0.5003278
[1] 0.4998868
[1] 0.4995651

It seems you are right, it is breaking ties in favour of class 2 twice as often as class 1.

share|improve this answer
    
You're looking at the distribution between classes one and two - and which ones of those have equal tree votes. I'm more interested in what happens when you take a single one of those feature vectors that are flipping between predictions. The random selection should be 50/50 and I'm see in this experiment 66/33 - in my actual data 80/20 and 90/10. So, I'm wondering what the basis of the selection is for a single feature vector that has the same number of tree votes in multiple classes. In my code, it is the "cat" line that should be 50/50 (I think), but is not (based on 1000 samples). –  Nate Dec 8 '11 at 5:14
    
I couldn't execute that part of the code, but try with more samples. I'm pretty sure we are both getting at the same thing. –  Benjamin Dec 8 '11 at 13:45
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up vote 1 down vote accepted

This should be fixed in version 4.6-3 of randomForest.

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