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Is this valid C++?

template<class category>
class any_iterator : public any_iterator<void>
{ 
public:
        typedef any_iterator<void> any_iter_void;

        any_iterator() : any_iter_void() {}
};
template<>
class any_iterator<void>
{ 
public:
        typedef any_iterator<void> any_iter_void;

        any_iterator() {}
        void foo() {};
};

int main() {
    any_iterator<int> a;
    a.foo();
}

MSVC10 accepts it with no errors/warnings on \WALL, but gcc-4.5.1 complains:

prog.cpp:3:5: error: invalid use of incomplete type 'class any_iterator'
prog.cpp:2:11: error: declaration of 'class any_iterator'
prog.cpp: In function 'int main()':
prog.cpp:21:11: error: 'class any_iterator' has no member named 'foo'
prog.cpp: In constructor 'any_iterator::any_iterator() [with category = int]':
prog.cpp:20:27: instantiated from here
prog.cpp:7:44: error: type 'any_iterator' is not a direct base of 'any_iterator'

Can someone quote the standard showing if this should or should not compile? I think this is a bug in MSVC.

As a note, I know the correct thing to do is to declare the class, specialize the root, then define the general case, and that's what I'll do to my code, but I was wondering which compiler is wrong here?

share|improve this question
    
MSVC's lack of two-phase name lookup strikes again. –  ildjarn Dec 7 '11 at 21:07
    
Instead of using a specialization for your base class, why not use a different class altogether? –  Mark Ransom Dec 7 '11 at 21:08
    
MSVC's implementation seems far handier IMO. –  Mooing Duck Dec 7 '11 at 21:10
    
@MarkRansom: The (real) classes form a hierarchy, of which users may add types (they're iterator categories). As such, any_iterator<void> makes sense as the root of everything. –  Mooing Duck Dec 7 '11 at 21:13

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

To inherit from a type, that type must be complete. A little rearranging solves things:

template<class category>
class any_iterator;

template<>
class any_iterator<void>
{ 
public:
    typedef any_iterator<void> any_iter_void;

    any_iterator() { }
    void foo() { }
};

template<class category>
class any_iterator : public any_iterator<void>
{ 
public:
    typedef any_iterator<void> any_iter_void;

    any_iterator() : any_iter_void() { }
};

int main()
{
    any_iterator<int> a;
    a.foo();
}

Token standard quotes:

C++11, §10/2:

The type denoted by a base-type-specifier shall be a class type that is not an incompletely defined class; this class is called a direct base class for the class being defined.

§9.2/2:

A class is considered a completely-defined object type (or complete type) at the closing } of the class-specifier.

share|improve this answer
    
Heh, and 3 votes too. Can someone quote the standard... and the correct thing to do is to declare the class, specialize the root, then define the general case... –  Mooing Duck Dec 7 '11 at 21:42
    
You want a standard quote saying that a type must be complete in order to derive from it? Isn't that common sense? –  ildjarn Dec 7 '11 at 21:43
    
It doesn't have to be, I thought. You can normally derive from a template type that isn't yet specialized can't you? As long as it's specialized before the derived type is instantiated? –  Mooing Duck Dec 7 '11 at 21:47
1  
@Mooing : It doesn't need to be specialized, but it needs a complete definition. When doing class any_iterator : public any_iterator<void> without a prior complete definition of any_iterator<void>, any_iterator itself is not yet complete (no opening { muchless closing }) so it cannot be specified as a base class. –  ildjarn Dec 7 '11 at 21:51
1  
@curiousguy : No, it's the code word for "you're unable to back up anything you're saying so why bother?" –  ildjarn Dec 12 '11 at 16:20

10/2:

The type denoted by a base-type-specifier shall be a class type that is not an incompletely defined class

It is one manifestation of the bug of MSVC: its lack of two-phase name resolution.

share|improve this answer
    
"its lack of two-phase name resolution." not just 2-phases lookup, it probably implements old-style templates-as-macro "semantics" –  curiousguy Dec 8 '11 at 20:01
    
@curiousguy: Since the code compiles, that means it saves the template instantiation for last though. –  Mooing Duck Dec 9 '11 at 22:04

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