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Say I have a List [1,2,4,5], I would like to have a predicate that returns 3 as the missing element. You can assuming that the input list is always sorted sequentially.

My solution so far:

% missing_number/2 (ListToBeChecked, ListToBeCompared, MissingNum)
missing_number([], [], []) :- !.
missing_number([Head | Tail], [Head | Rest], Number) :- 
    missing_number(Tail, Rest, Number).
missing_number(_, [X | _], [X | Node]) :- 
    missing_number(_, _, Number), !.
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Isn't a predicate something that returns true or false..? –  arasmussen Dec 7 '11 at 22:14
2  
you obviously don't use prolog. –  chutsu Dec 7 '11 at 22:15
1  
@arasmussen: in Prolog, there are no functions, only predicates "returning" values through unification. –  larsmans Dec 7 '11 at 22:16

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Use between/3 to generate all numbers from min to max. Use memberchk/2 (or member/2) to find the missing ones.

L = [1,2,4,5],
L = [M|_],
last(L, N),
between(M, N, I),
\+ memberchk(I, L).

Exercise for the reader: wrap this up in a predicate.

EDIT Efficient solution, by popular request:

missing([I,K|_], M) :-
    I1 is I+1,
    K1 is K-1,
    between(I1, K1, M).
missing([_|Ns], M) :-
    missing(Ns, M).

EDIT 2: More elegant version of the above, inspired by @chac, not necessarily very efficient:

missing(L,M) :- append(_, [I,J|_], L), I1 is I+1, J1 is J-1, between(I1,J1,M).
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and you run through the list lots of times while 1 run is needed... ;( –  m09 Dec 7 '11 at 22:18
    
@Mog: the OP did not ask for an efficient solution ;) This is just the short solution. –  larsmans Dec 7 '11 at 22:20
    
The solution works, but what about an efficient solution? I made my own solution perhaps you would like to have a look? –  chutsu Dec 7 '11 at 22:31
1  
sure, you should have added it to the OP –  m09 Dec 7 '11 at 22:35
1  
@chutsu: see edit. –  larsmans Dec 7 '11 at 22:37

The paradigmatic predicate append/3 many times can help in duties involving lists: here suffice to check for consecutive elements that aren't successors:

missing(L, M) :-
    append(_, [A,B|_], L),
    \+ succ(A, B), succ(A, M).

Completed

To be able to fulfill gaps of length > 1, the solution ends up almost identical to the larsman one:

missing(L, M) :-
    append(_, [A,B|_], L),
    succ(A, S), succ(P, B), between(S, P, M).

succ/2 allows a more declarative approach, but it's noticeably slower than arithmetic.

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Bug: M is a singleton variable in this program. –  larsmans Dec 7 '11 at 22:43
    
yes, should always test before post. Sorry –  CapelliC Dec 7 '11 at 22:44
    
Now it returns false positives, if I replace the last , with a . –  larsmans Dec 7 '11 at 22:44
    
Just to note, it's correct now. I was editing inline and hit submit too early. –  CapelliC Dec 8 '11 at 21:07
    
It's still not correct. missing([0, 1, 4, 5, 7, 9], M). skips M=3. –  larsmans Dec 8 '11 at 22:46

it doesn't work for unsorted lists

missing([], []).
missing([H|T], R) :- missing([H|T], H, R).
missing([], _I, []).
missing([H|T], I, [I|R]) :-
    H =\= I,
    !,
    NextI is I + 1,
    missing([H|T], NextI, R).
missing([_|T], I, R) :-
    NextI is I + 1,
    missing(T, NextI, R).
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missing([], []).
missing([H|T], R) :- missing([H|T], H, R).
missing([], _I, []).
missing([H|T], I, [I|R]) :-
    H =\= I,
    !,
    NextI is I + 1,
    missing([H|T], NextI, R).
missing([_|T], I, R) :-
    NextI is I + 1,
    missing(T, NextI, R).

for the no helper predicate one.

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Overly complicated. See my edited answer. –  larsmans Dec 7 '11 at 22:38
    
well, it's longer but actually simpler to understand from my point of vue, matter of taste I guess :) –  m09 Dec 7 '11 at 22:39
    
Doesn't work either, except on non-empty lists without missing elements :p –  larsmans Dec 7 '11 at 22:39
    
that's the risk of the non test thingy :D I'll check it after my reboot. –  m09 Dec 7 '11 at 22:42
    
correct now. Still long, but well... –  m09 Dec 7 '11 at 22:49

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