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I have a utility method that goes through various classes and recursively retrieves the fields. I want to check if that field is a Collection. Here is some sample code:

void myMethod(Class<?> classToCheck)

Field[] fields = classToCheck.getDeclaredFields();

for(Field field:fields)
{
   // check if field if a Collection<?>

}

Thanks in advance for the help.

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1  
Do you want to test whether the declared type of the field is an implementation of Collection, or whether the actual object referred to by the field in any given object implements Collection? The two results would differ if a) the Field was declared as Object, but an object implementing Collection was assigned to it, or b) the Field was declared as Collection (or a descendant) but it was null. –  DJClayworth Dec 7 '11 at 22:32
    

6 Answers 6

up vote 24 down vote accepted
if (Collection.class.isAssignableFrom(field.getType())) {

}
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@DJClayworth nope, it returns Class<?>. Check the javadoc –  Bozho Dec 7 '11 at 22:30
    
    
Already tried this and it doesn't work. –  user979467 Dec 7 '11 at 23:06
2  
@user979467 I just tested it, it works. Maybe you are doing something else wrong? –  increment1 Dec 8 '11 at 0:24
    
@Bozho My apologies, I found documentation that said it returned Type. Don't know where I found it now, so I'll just withdraw the comment. –  DJClayworth Dec 12 '11 at 19:40

You should use Class.isAssignableFrom:

if (Collection.class.isAssignableFrom(field.getType())
    ...
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isAssignableFrom takes a Class, where getType() returns a Type –  DJClayworth Dec 7 '11 at 22:29
2  
nope, it returns a Class –  Bozho Dec 7 '11 at 22:30

You can use getType() in the following way:

if (field.getType().equals(Collection.class) {
    // Do something
}

This will only work if the field is declared as a Collection. It will not work if the field is a subtype of Collection, such as List or Vector.

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Using the getType() method

Field field =  ...;
if ( Collection.class.isAssignableFrom( field.getType() ) ){
  //do something with your collection
}
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1  
nope, that's not it. This will get the class that owns the field, rather than the field type –  Bozho Dec 7 '11 at 22:20
    
Indeed. I just noticed my mistake by actually reading the javadoc. So far relying on my memory. Corrected my answer –  Robin Dec 7 '11 at 22:21
for(Field field:fields) { // check if field if a Collection
  Object myInstance = field.get(classInstance); 
    // where classInstance is the instance in which the fields is stored
    if(myInstance instanceof Collection) {
        //Do your thing
    }
}

This tests whether the actual object referred to by the field 'field' (of the object classInstance) implements Collection. If you want to tests whether the declared type of Field implements Collection then that will be different.

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1  
and what if it is null ? –  Bozho Dec 7 '11 at 22:31
    
Then it isn't an instanceof Collection. instanceof handles this case correctly, I believe. –  DJClayworth Dec 12 '11 at 19:41
    
New edits make it clear this wasn't the question the OP was asking, but I'll leave this here as a reference. –  DJClayworth Dec 12 '11 at 19:43

//This execute if

 List<String> cashType = split(" ,AlL ");
 if(cashType instanceof Collection){
     System.out.println("cashType instanceof Collection");
 }else{
     System.out.println("cashType is not instanceof Collection");
 }

//This executes else

List<String> cashType = split(" ,AlL ");
 if(cashType instanceof Hashtable){
     System.out.println("cashType instanceof Collection");
 }else{
     System.out.println("cashType is not instanceof Collection");
 }
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