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Here is what I have in my nginx.conf:

#user  nobody;
worker_processes  1;
#error_log  logs/error.log;
#error_log  logs/error.log  notice;
#error_log  logs/error.log  info;
#pid        logs/nginx.pid;
events {
    worker_connections  1024;
     }
http {
    passenger_root /usr/lib/ruby/gems/1.9.1/gems/passenger-3.0.11;
    passenger_ruby /usr/bin/ruby;
    include       mime.types;
    default_type  application/octet-stream;
    sendfile        on;
    #tcp_nopush     on;
    #keepalive_timeout  0;
    keepalive_timeout  65;

    gzip  on;
    gzip_http_version 1.1;
    gzip_comp_level 2;
    gzip_types    text/plain text/html text/css
                  application/x-javascript text/xml
                  application/xml application/xml+rss
                  text/javascript;
    server {
        listen       80;
        server_name  domain.com www.domain.com;

        # autoindex on;
        passenger_enabled on;
        rails_env production;

        access_log  logs/mrfs.access.log;

        location / {
            root   /opt/nginx/html/mrfs/public; #line updated per suggestion below
        }

        }
  }

I can toggle the autoindex on and off and it will display a 403 error when it is commented out or a directory listing when it is on. When I have access to the directory listings, I can surf them and download various files. This seems to me to make it not a permissions issue. When I have auto index disabled I get a can not list directory error in the error log. I think what I need to do is tell nginx how to load my index.html.erb file? How do I do that? Is that what is wrong?

Update

I put an 'index.html' in my /opt/nginx/html/mrfs/public folder and it loads that. So what would cause rails/nginx/passenger to load index.html file in public, but not load the home.html.erb file in my routes? I can run 'rails s' and then do a wget http://localhost and it pulls down the right html file.

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3 Answers 3

You need to set the root to the public directory of your project:

server {
    ...
    passenger_enabled on;
    rails_env production;
    root   /opt/nginx/html/mrfs/public;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Does public have a special meaning? I realize it is probably conventional to do it that way and I'll add a public directory and put it all there there. But what I did is just a git pull off my rails repo on github. –  Noah Clark Dec 7 '11 at 22:21
1  
Your rails app should have a directory that is called public, it's generated by rails new. It's basically the web root of all rails apps. –  halfdan Dec 7 '11 at 22:27
    
Thanks. I was thinking something like public_html. –  Noah Clark Dec 7 '11 at 22:40
    
I added that to my config and it still does the same thing: autoindex on; results in directory listing of of the public folder and if I turn it off I get the 403 forbidden error. –  Noah Clark Dec 7 '11 at 22:44
1  
Ok - that repo looks fine. I can't think of any other reason for the behaviour you describe right now. –  halfdan Dec 7 '11 at 23:56

In addition to the 'public' folder correction in the other answer, it sounds to me like there's an issue with permissions/ownership of the folders containing your app. There should be a line in the nginx.conf like...

user websrv;

which defines the user that nginx runs itself under. The folder with your rails app should be owned by that user, and permissions should be set appropriately.

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I've added the user lines from my config in to original question above. The default is 'nobody' but root is the owner. I can access the files just fine with autoindex on set. Is there a way I could do that if the permissions were set wrong? –  Noah Clark Dec 8 '11 at 0:02
1  
Ok, so what I understand you're saying is that nginx is running as a user named 'nobody', which is good, but that the folders are owned by root, which is not good. Correct me if I misunderstood. Otherwise, correct the ownership. I have no idea what autoindex would or would not do under those conditions. –  Jon Garvin Dec 8 '11 at 0:09
    
I changed ownership on the whole /html directory to 'nobody' and confirmed this by running ls -l on the html directory, the mrfs directory and the public folder. I restarted the nginx server and still get the 403 forbidden error. –  Noah Clark Dec 8 '11 at 0:23
1  
Hmmmm... Ok, so 'nobody' owns all the folders and files within /opt/nginx/html now. Permissions should be rwxrwxr-x on all folders and rw-rw-r on all files. I don't think that having the app installed in /opt/nginx/html should be a problem, but maybe nginx considers that reserved for static html files??? We put our Rails apps in /var/rails/[appname]. Another suggestion is to setup Capistrano to do deploys. Once configured cap deploy:setup will prepare all the correct folders on the server and make sure they have the right permissions and ownership. –  Jon Garvin Dec 8 '11 at 0:42
1  
Well, than I'm at a loss. This thread might help link Good luck! –  Jon Garvin Dec 8 '11 at 1:10
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Here is what I had to change it to:

server {
        listen       80;
        server_name  domain.com www.domain.com;
        rails_env production;
        passenger_use_global_queue on;
        access_log  logs/mrfs.access.log;
         root   /opt/nginx/html/mrfs/public;
        passenger_enabled on;
       error_page  404              /404.html;
       error_page   500 502 503 504  /50x.html;
    }

}

If you have a location / in your nginx.conf then you have to put passenger_enabled on; inside of that or else delete the location / block. I chose to delete it.

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