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I'm an Objective-C developer with little C/C++ experience (and zero training), and I encountered something strange today with hard coded numeric values.

I'm sure it's a simple/stupid question, but can someone please explain why this works:

NSDate *start = [NSDate date];
dispatch_time_t popTime = dispatch_time(DISPATCH_TIME_NOW, 1 * NSEC_PER_SEC);

dispatch_after(popTime, dispatch_get_main_queue(), ^{
  NSLog(@"seconds: %f", [start timeIntervalSinceNow]);
});
// output: seconds: -1.0001

And this also works (note number of seconds has changed):

NSDate *start = [NSDate date];
dispatch_time_t popTime = dispatch_time(DISPATCH_TIME_NOW, 2 * NSEC_PER_SEC);

dispatch_after(popTime, dispatch_get_main_queue(), ^{
  NSLog(@"seconds: %f", [start timeIntervalSinceNow]);
});
// output: seconds: -2.0001

But this is executed immediately:

NSDate *start = [NSDate date];
dispatch_time_t popTime = dispatch_time(DISPATCH_TIME_NOW, 4 * NSEC_PER_SEC);

dispatch_after(popTime, dispatch_get_main_queue(), ^{
  NSLog(@"seconds: %f", [start timeIntervalSinceNow]);
});
// output: seconds: -0.0001

However, using 4.0 instead of 4 fixes it:

NSDate *start = [NSDate date];
dispatch_time_t popTime = dispatch_time(DISPATCH_TIME_NOW, 4.0 * NSEC_PER_SEC);

dispatch_after(popTime, dispatch_get_main_queue(), ^{
  NSLog(@"seconds: %f", [start timeIntervalSinceNow]);
});
// output: seconds: -4.0001

Why do 1 and 2 properly cast to the relevant double value, but bigger numbers (I tested 3 and 4) appear to be represented as 0?

I'm compiling with Xcode 4.2, configured to use LLVM 3.0.

EDIT:

dispatch_time_t is defined as:

typedef uint64_t dispatch_time_t;

And dispatch_time is:

dispatch_time_t dispatch_time(dispatch_time_t when, int64_t delta);

And NSEC_PER_SEC is:

#define NSEC_PER_SEC    1000000000  /* nanoseconds per second */
share|improve this question
    
What is dispatch_time's parameter? –  Pubby Dec 7 '11 at 23:07
    
Thanks @Pubby, I've updated the question. –  Abhi Beckert Dec 7 '11 at 23:11
    
that seems very strange that 1,2 work and 3,4 don't... I would double check that, but you do certainly see instances where ints will evaluate to 0f. –  Grady Player Dec 7 '11 at 23:12

3 Answers 3

up vote 18 down vote accepted

There are 1,000,000,000 nanoseconds in a second, so I'm going to assume that NSEC_PER_SEC is defined as 1000000000.

  • 4 is of type int
  • 4.0 is of type double

Now assuming that an int contains 32 bits, the range of an int would be [-2,147,483,648 to 2,147,483,647]

4000000000 > 2147483647, therefore you'll cause the int to overflow, which is causing the value to be set to 0.

EDIT: I probably could've worded the above statement better. The overflow could cause the int (assuming it's 32 bits in size, as stated above) to equal the value -294967296, and dispatch_time would be treating any value <= 0 as 0 seconds. That's where the "0" above came from.

A double variable can hold larger values than an int, and is able to store an approximation of the value 4000000000.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for a perfectly clear answer. :) –  Abhi Beckert Dec 7 '11 at 23:21
1  
Exactly spot on. +1. –  Jonathan Grynspan Dec 8 '11 at 2:57
1  
When the calculation overflows, you'll get wrap around, not zero. The value here will probably be < 0, and dispatch is probably treating that as 'do it immediately'. –  Jon Hess Dec 8 '11 at 8:30
    
@JonHess: I intended it to mean that the overflow is causing the timer to be set to 0, I should probably reword it. –  AusCBloke Dec 8 '11 at 9:53
    
@JonHess: And I think "overflow" is a better expression than "wrap around", since negative values have a greater unsigned value than positive ones (in terms of the bit sequence and 4000000000 fits into an unsigned 32 bit integer). "wrap around" would kind of imply that bits are chopped off/wrap around past 0000... –  AusCBloke Dec 8 '11 at 10:17

The first two work because 1 * 10^9 and 2 * 10^9 fit in a signed 32-bit int. However, 4*10^9 will not fit in a signed 32-bit int.

4.0 * 10^9 works because floating point can represent that value.

I expect that this will work too:

dispatch_time_t popTime = dispatch_time(DISPATCH_TIME_NOW, ((int64_t)4) * NSEC_PER_SEC);
share|improve this answer

I know nothing about Objective C, but my guess is that 4 * NSEC_PER_SEC is too big for a 32-bit integer. By using 4.0 you force the the multiplication into floating point arithmetic and get around the problem.

Update

It may be 64-bit code, but in some languages (and I know C# is one) a numeric literal defaults to a 32-bit signed integer unless you explicitly define it otherwise. That may be what's happening here.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, "NSEC" is nanoseconds, so it's a big number. I have updated my question with it's definition. By the way, this is all 64 bit code, though I don't know if that makes a difference. –  Abhi Beckert Dec 7 '11 at 23:13
    
See my updated answer. –  Andrew Cooper Dec 7 '11 at 23:19
    
Yes, on 32-bit UNIX or 64-bit UNIX, int is 32-bits –  Anthony Blake Dec 7 '11 at 23:23
    
I'm not sure about literals, but int is certainly 32 bit at least in the current version of Objective-C. Based on @AusCBloke's answer 2 seconds would only just fit in a 32 bit int, so that must be what's going on. Apple recently started pushing everyone to use a new NSInteger type, which is 64 bit when compiling for a 64 bit CPU (otherwise it's 32 bit). I imagine they'll switch literals to that type one day. –  Abhi Beckert Dec 7 '11 at 23:26

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