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I just wanted to know what does the special character @ means in the selenium CSS locator.

For example, for the HTML

<select id="ms1" multiple="multiple">
    <option id="oa">
     OptionA
    </option>
    <option id="ob" selected="selected">
     OptionB
    </option>
    <option id="oc">
     OptionD
    </option>
</select>

I get the following element presence results with different CSS locators-

# s1 is selenium object
>>> s1.is_element_present('css=select[multiple="multiple"][id="ms1"]')
False
>>> s1.is_element_present('css=select[@multiple="multiple"][id="ms1"]')
True
>>> s1.is_element_present('css=select[@multiple="multiple"][@id="ms1"]')
False
>>> s1.is_element_present('css=select[multiple="multiple"][@id="ms1"]')
False
>>> 

Any help please?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

The @ character has no special purpose in a Selenium CSS selector. It has special meaning in the Selenium getAttribute command, but that's not what you're using here.

The correct way to write your seach is:

s1.is_element_present('css=select#ms1[multiple="multiple"]')

However, since id attributes are supposed to be unique, the following ought to work just as well, and probably quicker:

s1.is_element_present('css=#ms1')

Or even quicker, because no CSS analysis is necessary:

s1.is_element_present('id=ms1')
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That is a great answer.... What I found is @ has no meaning!! If you provide @ with an locator type, other work takes over and it work!! If both locator types are provided with @, the search fails!! Thanks –  abarik Dec 9 '11 at 20:41

The @ locator is used to select the "attributes" in the document.

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