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I have a project in which I had to allow a user to enter employees into a hash table, however we couldn't use the predefined hash table stuff. I ended up going with an array of arraylists, and the constructor gave it a value, so that it wouldn't get a nullpointerexception... and then it got one anyways, on the first line that used the hashtable. I commented out that snippet because it wasn't absolutely necessary, and then the same issue cropped up in the next instance of hash. The class and constructor:

public class Hash {
  private ArrayList<Employee>[] hash = (ArrayList<Employee>[])new ArrayList[5];

//
public Hash()
{
    ArrayList<Employee>[] q = (ArrayList<Employee>[])new ArrayList[5];
   hash=q; 
}

and the code where it breaks down:

do
           {
               p = (int) (Math.random( )*999999) + 1 ;
               for (int w = 0; w<5; w++)
               {
                   boolean t = hash[w].isEmpty(); // The line where I get the NPE Error
                   if (t=false)
                   {
                    for (int r = 0 ; r<hash[w].size(); r++) //where it shows up if I comment out the above.
                    {
                   o=o||p==(hash[r].get(w).geteN());
                   }

               }               
           }
           }
           while (o = true);

I'm really not sure how to handle this one... Thanks in advance.

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1  
Your array of ArrayLists doesn't contain anything –  Jeel Shah Dec 8 '11 at 1:26
1  
what does this line mean? is it supposed to be in an if statement? o=o||p==(hash[r].get(w).geteN()); –  blazingkin Dec 8 '11 at 1:28
    
Also looking through your code it is obvious that you have like no experience programming, as you have if statements with single = I will post a correct version in a second –  blazingkin Dec 8 '11 at 1:30
    
well first of all I think you meant "if (t==false)" instead of "if(t=false)", am I right?? –  Raúl Núñez Cuevas Dec 8 '11 at 1:35
    
@blazingkin: the line you quoted is fine, so long as o is a boolean and hash[r].get(w).geteN() returns an int. Read it as "o equals o ORed with (is p equal to hash[r].get(w).geteN())". –  Mac Dec 8 '11 at 1:35

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Remember that when you declare an Array of Objects in Java, you have to set each element of the Array to something. Otherwise you just have an array of nulls.

Try this in your constructor instead:

for (int i=0; i<hash.length; i++)
    hash[i] = new ArrayList<Employee>();

The exception is if you declare an Array of primitives (such as int, double, and so on), and then you get zeros instead.

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That did the trick. I actually have like a page of NullPointerExceptions, but I thought they were all due to the same issue occurring in a lot of places... guess not. Either way, hopefully I'll be able to handle the rest (and maybe ask my teacher about the errors in the NetBeans auto generated code), and thanks. –  Turbler Dec 8 '11 at 2:23

You did not finish initializing your array.

public Hash() {
    ArrayList<Employee>[] q = (ArrayList<Employee>[])new ArrayList[5];
    for (int i = 0 ; i != q.length ; i++) {
        q[i] = new ArrayList<Employee>();
    }
    hash=q; 
}

The initializer at the point of declaration also has no effect, you can remove the assignment, since you're initializing the array in the constructor anyway.

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1  
You could also add that q is an unnecessary temporary variable that can be replaced by the instance variable hash. –  AusCBloke Dec 8 '11 at 1:41
    
@AusCBloke This is an excellent point. I tried to stay as close to the original as possible, so that it is easier for the OP to recognize what has changed. –  dasblinkenlight Dec 8 '11 at 1:51

You've created an array to hold 5 ArrayList<Employee>, however you haven't created each of those 5 ArrayLists to go inside the array.

Therefore no references to ArrayList<Employee> objects exist in your array, but instead each element in your array is set to the initial value of null. Because of this, when you try and use any of these non-existent ArrayList<Employee>s, you'll cause a NullPointerException to be thrown.

After you create the array, create each individual ArrayList<Employee> like so:

for (int i = 0; i < hash.length; i++)
   hash[i] = newArrayList<Employee>();
share|improve this answer

Your code is very strange and random, also the other code would help to see if you ever initialized it (that's probably your issue), but here is my best interpretation of the code.

do {
        p = (int) (Math.random( )*999999) + 1 ;
        for (int w = 0; w<5; w++) {
            if ( hash[w] != null){
            boolean t = hash[w].isEmpty(); // The line where I get the NPE Error
                if (t == false){
                    for (int r = 0; r<hash[w].size(); r++) {
                        o=o||p==(hash[r].get(w).geteN());
                    }

                }
            }           
        }
   }
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... however we couldn't use the predefined hash table stuff.

I think that this is your real mistake. Unless you have some extreme performance or memory usage constraints, you are better off using one of the standard Java implementations of hash tables (or a 3rd party one from Apache Commons, Google Guava, etc). They work (provided you don't do something stupid ... like using mutable keys). They perform well in typical use-cases. Everyone understands them.

Implementing your own hash tables is almost certainly a bad option, not least because it is easy to create an implementation that doesn't scale well in various respects. IMO, your best option going forward would be to junk your home-brew hash table code before it gets too baked into your application.


Commenting on your actual code, I don't understand how a hash table can possibly work if you insert random numbers into the process. Your code is incomprehensible from an algorithmic perspective ... it makes no sense to me.


If you told us why you thought that you couldn't use one of the standard implementations, we'd probably be able to advise you better.

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