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I'm using C# .Net 4.0. I generate the key and IV(initialization vector) using the rijindael class. I then write both of them to a file. The IV is always correct when I read the file, but the last byte of the key is always zero. I look at the key before writing to the file and it is fine, reading it back in the last byte is always zero.

I have tried setting the padding mode to the various choices and they don't make a difference.

using (Rijndael myRijndael = Rijndael.Create())
{
    //Create keys
    try
    {
        byte[] key;
        byte[] iv;

        key = new byte[32];
        iv = new byte[16];

        theKeys.Key = myRijndael.Key;
        theKeys.IV = myRijndael.IV;

        FileStream fs = File.Create("yyy.txt");
        fs.Write(theKeys.Key, 0, theKeys.Key.Length);
        fs.Flush();
        fs.Close();

        FileStream ts = File.Open("yyy.txt", FileMode.Append);
        ts.Write(theKeys.IV, 0, theKeys.IV.Length);
        ts.Flush();
        ts.Close();


        FileStream ms = File.Open("yyy.txt", FileMode.Open);

         ms.Read(key, 0, 31);
         ms.Seek(32, 0);
         ms.Read(iv, 0, 16);
         ms.Flush();
         ms.Close();
    }
    catch (Exception ex)
    {
        Console.WriteLine(ex.Message);
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
Can you post the code you are using? I suspect that you are not writing all of the data to the file. –  competent_tech Dec 8 '11 at 2:17
    
I must not be doing something right with the posting of code. Is there a trick to make it look like code instead of wrapped? –  larmister Dec 8 '11 at 2:40
    
Your code for writing looks fine, although it could easily be shortened to 3-4 lines. Now you need to show us the code you use for reading. –  dtb Dec 8 '11 at 2:51
    
See above code. I added in the code I'm using to read the data in. –  larmister Dec 8 '11 at 3:01
    
So you read 31 instead of 32 bytes and are wondering by the last byte is missing? –  dtb Dec 8 '11 at 3:03

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted
// Save key and IV
using (var rijndael = new RijndaelManaged())
using (var writer = new BinaryWriter(File.Create("yyy.dat")))
{
    writer.Write(rijndael.Key, 0, 32);
    writer.Write(rijndael.IV, 0, 16);
}

// Restore key and IV
using (var rijndael = new RijndaelManaged())
using (var reader = new BinaryReader(File.OpenRead("yyy.dat")))
{
    rijndael.Key = reader.ReadBytes(32);
    rijndael.IV = reader.ReadBytes(16);
}
share|improve this answer

The problem is that you are only asking to read in 31 bytes:

ms.Read(key, 0, 31);

This should be changed to:

ms.Read(key, 0, 32);

Also, this can be much more efficient (leaving out use of theKeys in this example and just using the local vars):

        using (Rijndael myRijndael = Rijndael.Create())
        {
            //Create keys
            try
            {
                byte[] key;
                byte[] iv;

                key = new byte[32];
                iv = new byte[16];

                key = myRijndael.Key;
                iv = myRijndael.IV;

                using (FileStream fs = File.Create("yyy.txt"))
                {
                    fs.Write(key, 0, key.Length);
                    fs.Write(iv, 0, iv.Length);
                }

                using (FileStream ms = File.Open("yyy.txt", FileMode.Open))
                {
                    key = new byte[32];
                    iv = new byte[16];

                    ms.Read(key, 0, 32);
                    ms.Read(iv, 0, 16);
                }
            }
            catch (Exception ex)
            {
                Console.WriteLine(ex.Message);
            }
        }
share|improve this answer
    
Note that ms.Read(key, 0, 32); reads between 1 to 32 bytes from ms into key, not necessarily exactly 32 bytes. –  dtb Dec 8 '11 at 3:17
    
@dtb: it is my understanding that that is only correct if the file does not contain enough data to satisfy the requested length. BinaryReader.ReadBytes will have the same problem. –  competent_tech Dec 8 '11 at 3:31
    
No. BinaryReader.ReadBytes(32) reads exactly 32 bytes and reads less if there are not enough bytes in the file. Stream.Read does not make such a guarantee, it just guarantees that at least 1 byte and at most 32 bytes are read (unless the there are no bytes remaining). –  dtb Dec 8 '11 at 3:39
    
That's interesting. I don't get that from the FileStream.Read documentation (not that I don't believe you, I just don't see where that behavior is necessarily called out). I can see how this would be the case for other than file streams and I can even see some cases where it would be the case for file streams (i.e. reading from a continuous log file, for example). Can you point me in the direction of any documentation that goes into further depth on this? I am very interested in reading up on it. –  competent_tech Dec 8 '11 at 3:40
    
BinaryReader.ReadBytes: "A byte array containing data read from the underlying stream. This might be less than the number of bytes requested if the end of the stream is reached." Stream.Read: "The total number of bytes read into the buffer. This can be less than the number of bytes requested if that many bytes are not currently available, or zero (0) if the end of the stream has been reached." –  dtb Dec 8 '11 at 3:44

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