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From Accelerated C++(book), I found this code which is identical program, but the processed in program itself is different, and confused me on some part.

The code below, well, obviously it will output each word one-by-one(by loops) based on user input after the user included end-of-file, then, end the program.

int main()
{
    string s;
    while (cin >> s)
        cout << s << endl;
    return  0;
}

Unlike code above, this one will store each word in a vector, then use index i and j to detect the non-whitespace character, and the real question is, I don't understand how it happens with the vector.

What is whitespace in vector? An element?

At first, I thought the program will proceed through each character, because I thought the whitespace is character(which i and j functionality is for), then, the book come and said it proceed through each word, I don't know how to test this myself, like I can see how the inner process in the compiler itself..

vector<string> split(const string& s)
{
    vector<string> ret;
    typedef string::size_type string_size;
    string_size i = 0;

    // invariant: we have processed characters [original value of i, i) 
    while (i != s.size())
    {
        // ignore leading blanks
        // invariant: characters in range [original i, current i) are all spaces
     while (i != s.size() && isspace(s[i]))
         ++i;

     // find end of next word
     string_size j = i;
     // invariant: none of the characters in range [original j, current j)is a space
     while (j != s.size() && !isspace(s[j]))
         j++;
         // if we found some nonwhitespace characters 
         if (i != j) {
             // copy from s starting at i and taking j - i chars
             ret.push_back(s.substr(i, j - i));
             i = j;
         }
    }
    return ret;
}

int main() {
    string s;
    // read and split each line of input 
    while (getline(cin, s)) {
        vector<string> v = split(s);

        // write each word in v
        for (vector<string>::size_type i = 0; i != v.size(); ++i)
             cout << v[i] << endl;
    }
    return 0;
}
share|improve this question
    
You're missing some braces ({, }) in your code. –  AusCBloke Dec 8 '11 at 2:04
    
well, I just copy it from the book –  Vastor Dec 8 '11 at 4:11

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The code you posted above does not split a line of text into words, based on whitespace, it instead splits a line into characters. However, that's if the code was actually compilable and not missing any necessary braces ({, }). EDIT: Actually whether it splits words or individual characters depends on where the braces go, bottom line is that the code doesn't compile.

Here is a fixed version of the code that splits each word, rather than each character, by simply moving the last if statement in split outside of it's immediate while block:

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>
using namespace std;

vector<string> split(const string& s)
{
   vector<string> ret;
   typedef string::size_type string_size;
   string_size i = 0;

   // invariant: we have processed characters [original value of i, i) 
   while (i != s.size()) {
      // ignore leading blanks
      // invariant: characters in range [original i, current i) are all spaces
      while (i != s.size() && isspace(s[i]))
         ++i;

      // find end of next word
      string_size j = i;
      // invariant: none of the characters in range [original j, current j)is a space
      while (j != s.size() && !isspace(s[j]))
         j++;

      // if we found some nonwhitespace characters 
      if (i != j) {
         // copy from s starting at i and taking j - i chars
         ret.push_back(s.substr(i, j - i));
         i = j;
      }
   }
   return ret;
}

int main() {
   string s;
   // read and split each line of input 
   while (getline(cin, s)) {
      vector<string> v = split(s);

      // write each word in v
      for (vector<string>::size_type i = 0; i != v.size(); ++i)
      cout << v[i] << endl;
   }
   return 0;
}

What happens to the string passed to split is:

  • While still characters in the string (while (i != s.size()))
    • While we're reading a space from the string while (i != s.size() && isspace(s[i]))
      • Increment the counter until we get to the start of a word (++i)
    • Set the end of the word as the start of the word (string_size j = i)
    • While we're still inside this word and not up to a space (while (j != s.size() && !isspace(s[j])))
      • Increment the counter indicating the end of the word (j++)
    • If there are some non-whitespace characters - end is greater than the start (if (i != j))
      • Create a sub-string from the start point to the end point of the word (s.substr(i, j - i)), and add that word to the vector (ret.push_back(..)).
    • Rinse and repeat.
share|improve this answer
    
doesn't you are the one who edit the title?, well, I said in the title "Identical program", which I mean, If u see on the first code, it has same output result like the second code, becoz of that, the code from the book is NOT missing any braces, just the spacing of in the code given is lame/unorganized, anyway, from your answer, I still not get the real answer(still in vague), bcoz, I'm trying to ask on "how the compiler processed the input based on the code given", still the explaination below your code help give me some clue... –  Vastor Dec 8 '11 at 5:10
    
@Vastor: The first code example and the fixed one I posted have the same output. And there are brackets missing in your second code example, either count them or try and compile it and you'll see. –  AusCBloke Dec 8 '11 at 5:14
    
so if I'm right, the compiler actually processed each "character", then stored in element(vector), and then access the element to output it onto the screen. seems to be my fault to overlooked of the position of push_back(which put char/word into element), I thought the compiler checking the word and character in the element itself... –  Vastor Dec 8 '11 at 5:21
    
btw, the missing bracket in the post is my fault(typo),n fixed, maybe you can copy paste again to a compiler to check how the second code works :) –  Vastor Dec 8 '11 at 5:25
    
@Vastor: Yeah the code is right now. You can also download the code samples from the Accelerated C++ book at it's homepage: acceleratedcpp.com. Each character is processed one by one in order to find a word between two spaces. Each word is pushed onto the end of the vector. –  AusCBloke Dec 8 '11 at 5:31

If you are just splitting based on space, then you don't need write a custom method. STL has options for you.

        std::string line;
        std::vector<std::string> strings;
        while ( std::getline(std::cin, line))
        {
             std::istringstream s ( line);
             strings.insert(strings.end(), 
                 std::istream_iterator<std::string>(s),  
                 std::istream_iterator<std::string>());
        }

     //  For simplicity sake using lambda.   
        std::for_each(strings.begin(), strings.end(), [](const std::string& str)
        {
            std::cout << str << "\n";
        });
share|improve this answer
1  
Or std::copy(std::istream_iterator<std::string>(s), std::istream_iterator<std::string>(), std::back_inserter(strings)) and similarly to display std::copy(strings.begin(), strings.end(), std::ostream_iterator<std::string>(std::cout, std::endl)) –  Ben Jackson Dec 8 '11 at 3:16
    
I'm not asking for a code(that work the same as mine) to compile, I'm asking about how a compiler processed the program, which I hope some can explain like AusCBloke's did. –  Vastor Dec 8 '11 at 4:19
    
oh, btw, I'm not learn STL yet... :) –  Vastor Dec 8 '11 at 4:28

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