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I'm writing a program that caches some results via the pickle module. What happens at the moment is that if I hit ctrl-c at while the dump operation is occurring, dump gets interrupted and the resulting file is corrupted (i.e. only partially written, so it cannot be loaded again.

Is there a way to make dump, or in general a block of code, uninterruptable? My current workaround looks something like this:

try:
  file = open(path, 'w')
  dump(obj, file)
  file.close()
except KeyboardInterrupt:
  file.close()
  file.open(path,'w')
  dump(obj, file)
  file.close()
  raise

It seems silly to restart the operation if it is interrupted, so I am searching for a way to defer the interrupt. How do I do this?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 16 down vote accepted

Put the function in a thread, and wait for the thread to finish.

Python threads cannot be interrupted except with a special C api.

import time
from threading import Thread

def noInterrupt():
    for i in xrange(4):
        print i
        time.sleep(1)

a = Thread(target=noInterrupt)
a.start()
a.join()
print "done"


0
1
2
3
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "C:\Users\Admin\Desktop\test.py", line 11, in <module>
    a.join()
  File "C:\Python26\lib\threading.py", line 634, in join
    self.__block.wait()
  File "C:\Python26\lib\threading.py", line 237, in wait
    waiter.acquire()
KeyboardInterrupt

See how the interrupt was deferred until the thread finished?

Here it is adapted to your use:

import time
from threading import Thread

def noInterrupt(path, obj):
    try:
        file = open(path, 'w')
        dump(obj, file)
    finally:
        file.close()

a = Thread(target=noInterrupt, args=(path,obj))
a.start()
a.join()
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Use the signal module to disable SIGINT for the duration of the process:

s = signal.signal(signal.SIGINT, signal.SIG_IGN)
do_important_stuff()
signal.signal(signal.SIGINT, s)
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1  
I was going to suggest this, but it doesn't work in windows. –  Unknown May 9 '09 at 6:52
    
I would have gone for that too if it was in a unix like system –  Nadia Alramli May 9 '09 at 11:50
    
This does work on windows. It happens via emulation of the Posix signals via the C runtime library msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/xdkz3x12%28v=vs.90%29.aspx –  Gary van der Merwe Apr 24 at 8:17

The following is a context manager that attaches a signal handler for SIGINT. If the context manager's signal handler is called, the signal is passed to the original handler when the context manager exits.

import signal
import logging

class DelayedKeyboardInterrupt(object):
    def __enter__(self):
        self.signal_received = False
        self.old_handler = signal.getsignal(signal.SIGINT)
        signal.signal(signal.SIGINT, self.handler)

    def handler(self, signal, frame):
        self.signal_received = (signal, frame)
        logging.debug('SIGINT received. Delaying KeyboardInterrupt.')

    def __exit__(self, type, value, traceback):
        signal.signal(signal.SIGINT, self.old_handler)
        if self.signal_received:
            self.old_handler(*self.signal_received)

with DelayedKeyboardInterrupt():
    # stuff here will not be interrupted by SIGINT
    critical_code()
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5  
Even though it may look daunting to some at first, I think this is the cleanest and most reusable solution. After all, you're defining the context manager only once (and you can easily do that in its own module, if you like) and then you only need one ''with'' line wherever you want to use it, which is a big plus for the readability of your code. –  blubberdiblub Apr 17 '14 at 3:59

In my opinion using threads for this is an overkill. You can make sure the file is being saved correctly by simply doing it in a loop until a successful write was done:

def saveToFile(obj, filename):
    file = open(filename, 'w')
    cPickle.dump(obj, file)
    file.close()
    return True

done = False
while not done:
    try:
        done = saveToFile(obj, 'file')
    except KeyboardInterrupt:
        print 'retry'
        continue
share|improve this answer
1  
+1: This approach is much more pythonic and easier to understand than the other two. –  kquinn May 9 '09 at 11:56
1  
+- 0: This approach isn't as good because you can interrupt it forever by holding down crtl+c while my thread approach never gets interrupted. Also note that you have to have another variable "isinterrupted" and another condition statement to reraise it afterwards. –  Unknown May 9 '09 at 18:14
2  
This approach also restarts the dump every time, which is part of what I wanted to avoid. –  saffsd May 10 '09 at 1:23
1  
@Unknown, @Saffsd: You are both right. But this solution is intended for simple applications, where you don't expect malicious use. It is a workaround for a very unlikely event of a user interrupting the dump unknowingly. You can choose the solution that suits your application best. –  Nadia Alramli May 10 '09 at 10:07
    
No, @Saffsd is not right. He should just move dump() out of saveToFile(). Then call dump() once and saveToFile() as many times as it's needed. –  Pavel Vlasov Sep 4 '12 at 1:21

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