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I was trying to create an 2d list in python that was x + 1,y + 1 sized and had some initial values. Those initial values are that the first row contains the numbers 0 to 'x' and the first column contains the numbers 0 to 'y' (both inclusively)

Lets say x and y were 3 and 4.

So I went: listName = [range(0, x + 1)] * (y + 1);

This gives me a 2d list that has 5 rows and each row is a list with the numbers 0 to 3 giving 4 indexes on each row (4 columns):

[[0, 1, 2, 3], 
 [0, 1, 2, 3], 
 [0, 1, 2, 3], 
 [0, 1, 2, 3], 
 [0, 1, 2, 3]]

I understand that at this point I have a 2d array, but each row is an instance so if I changed any value in each row, all the rows would reflect that change. So to fix that I decided to set each row to a new unique list:

for row in listName:
    row = range(0, x + 1);

But I noticed that this seems to have no effect, my original list Even if I went:

for row in listName:
    row = ["A", "B", "C", "D"];

Printing before and after the assignment shows 'row' is getting changed, but outside the loop, I get my original list when I print it. Even though I've found another way to do what I want, I can't seem to figure out why this happens. Any ideas?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Slice-assign in order to modify the existing list, instead of just rebinding the name.

row[:] = ...

Also, you're constructing it incorrectly.

listName = [range(0, x + 1) for z in range(y + 1)]
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the quick reply, and using slice-assignment does work for assignment, though keeps all the row-lists as instances to each other. The second line you wrote does indeed work, but I've never really seen creating a list (or any code) in front of a for loop before. By changing the first part, it see that it somehow 'multiples' that list like before ( but making a new unique list each time) per iteration of the loop, but I can't quite grasp how a for loop can do that, nor can I find anything like that in the documentation. Can you explain what it's really doing? –  mitim Dec 8 '11 at 3:53
    
The original code creates a list that contains y + 1 copies of a reference to the same list. The new code is a list comprehension. –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Dec 8 '11 at 3:57
    
Ah I see. I was mislead by just looking at 'loop'. I shall go read about list comprehensions now. –  mitim Dec 8 '11 at 4:02

When you assign a list to a name you're effectively instantiating a new list. Python has a special syntax that allows you to do this:

row[:] = …

>>> listName = [range(0, x + 1)] * (y + 1);
>>> listName
[[0, 1, 2, 3], [0, 1, 2, 3], [0, 1, 2, 3], [0, 1, 2, 3], [0, 1, 2, 3]]
>>> for row in listName:
...     row[:] = range(0, x+1)
... 
>>> listName
[[0, 1, 2, 3], [0, 1, 2, 3], [0, 1, 2, 3], [0, 1, 2, 3], [0, 1, 2, 3]]
>>> for row in listName:
...     row[:] = range(0, x+6)
... 
>>> listName
[[0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8], [0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8], [0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8], [0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8], [0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8]]

But based on your original question, did you want to do this?

>>> [range(0, x+1)] + [[i] + [0]*x for i in xrange(1, y+1)]
[[0, 1, 2, 3], [1, 0, 0, 0], [2, 0, 0, 0], [3, 0, 0, 0], [4, 0, 0, 0]]
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Yes, that's exactly what I want. Like my other reply, I'm a bit confused how adding a for loop at the end works though. –  mitim Dec 8 '11 at 3:58
    
@mitim It's a list comprehension that creates a list of lists. The first value in each list is the incremental value of y, and the second - xth value are all zeros. –  kojiro Dec 8 '11 at 13:15
    
Yes, another reply mentioned it and I looked it up. It makes sense now. –  mitim Dec 8 '11 at 23:43

But I noticed that this seems to have no effect, my original list

Because row = range(0, x + 1) does not mean "The contents of the thing that row refers to shall be replaced with the contents of the list range(0, x + 1)"; it means "The name row shall cease referring to what it currently refers to, and instead refer to the list range(0, x + 1)".

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Oh, I see then. That makes sense. –  mitim Dec 8 '11 at 3:56

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