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This question is meant to apply to interfaces in general, but I'll use AS3/Flex for my language. It should be [mostly] obvious how to apply it in different languages.

If I create a base class, and it extends an interface, there is an explicit contract defined: for every method in the interface, the base class must implement said method.

This is easy enough. But I don't understand why you have the capacity to cast an interfaced instance back to its original base class. Of course, I've had to do this a few times (the example below is very close to the situation I'm struggling with), but that doesn't mean I understand it :^)

Here's a sample interface:

public interface IFooable extends IUIComponent {
    function runFoo():void;
}

Let's say I create a base class, which extends VBox and implements the interface:

public class Foo extends VBox implements IFooable {
    public Foo() {
        super();
        //stuff here to create Foo..blah blah
    }
    public function runFoo():void {
        // do something to run foo
    }
}

Now, the reason I used the interface, is because I want to guarantee "runFoo" is always implemented. It is a common piece of functionality all of my classes should have, regardless of how they implement it. Thus, my parent class (an Application) will instantiate Foo via its interface:

public function init():void {
    var foo:IFooable = new Foo();
    foo.percentHeight = 100; //works because of IUIComponent
}

But, if I want to add Foo to the Application container, I now have to cast it back to the base class (or to a different base class):

public function init():void {
    var foo:IFooable = new Foo();
    foo.percentHeight = 100;

    addChild(foo as DisplayObject); //_have_ to cast, because addChild takes a 'DisplayObject' class type

    //could also do this:
    //addChild(foo as VBox);
}

Wasn't the original intention to hide the implementation of Foo? There is still an assumption that Foo is a DisplayObject. Unfortunately, being able to add the custom object to a container seems impossible without casting.

Am I missing something entirely? Is this really just a phenomenon in Flex/AS3? If you have a container in the base API of a language, and it only allows you to add children of a certain class type, how do you then abstract out implementation?

For the record, this question appears to ask if this sort of operation is possible, but it doesn't really address why it might be bad design (and how to fix it).


2nd Thought:

Abstract Classes:

As Matthew pointed out, abstract classes helps solve some of this: I could create a base abstract class which inherits from the DisplayObject (or, in my case, the VBox, since it is a child of DisplayObject), and have the base class implement the interface. Thus, any class which extends the abstract class would then be required to implement the methods therein.

Great idea -- but AS3 doesn't have abstract classes (to my knowledge, anyway).

So, I could create a base class which implements interface and extends the VBox, and inherit from it, and I could insert code in those methods which need to be extended; such code would throw an error if the base class is the executor. Unfortunately, this is run-time checking as opposed to compile-time enforcement.

It's still a solution, though.


Context:

Some context might help:

I have an application which can have any number of sub-containers. Each of these sub-containers will have their own respective configuration options, parameters, etc.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Okay, I'm anaswering generally, because you said, "Is this really just a phenomenon in Flex/AS3?".

In your init method, obviously you're always calling addChild with foo. That means foo must always be an instance of DisplayObject. You also want it to be an instance of IFooable (though it's not clear here why). Since DisplayObject is a class, you would consider using a subclass of DisplayObject (e.g. FooableDisplayObject), that implemented IFooable. In Java, this would the below. I'm not familiar with AS, but I think this shows there's not any general flaw in interfaces here.

interface IFooable
{
    public void runFoo();
}

class DisplayObject
{

}

abstract class FooableDisplayObject extends DisplayObject implements IFooable
{

}

class Foo extends FooableDisplayObject
{
    public void runFoo()
    {

    }
}

public void init()
{
    FooableDisplayObject foo = new Foo();
    foo.percentHeight = 100;

    addChild(foo);
}
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1  
Ahh, here lies an interesting point: AS3 does not have abstract classes. I'm going to update my original post with a fuller reply. Thanks for mentioning them, because I completely forgot about abstract classes. Your answer makes complete sense, but there are some issues in AS3. –  bedwyr May 9 '09 at 5:17
    
Yes, I think you have a handle on the best way to go: Make a non-abstract base class FooableDisplayObject (or FooableVBox or whatever), and just be sure you only instantiate subclasses that correctly override the base. This should be tolerable as long as you're not exposing FooableVBox as part of a public API. –  Matthew Flaschen May 9 '09 at 17:33
    
See also joshblog.net/2007/08… for how one person implemented a run-time approximation of a abstract class. –  Matthew Flaschen May 9 '09 at 17:46
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@James Ward, That's definitely something I wish was in the language, probably a interface IDisplayObject. That would solve a lot of issues in OOP display programing in AS3.

In regards the the original question, something I've used in the past, and have seen mentioned on www.as3dp.com is to include a getDisplay():DisplayObject method in the interface, which would typically return "this" by its implementor. It's less than ideal, but works.

@Matthew Flaschen, While we don't have Abstarct Classes native to AS3, common practice is to name the class with the word Abstract ie: AbstarctMyObject, and then just treat it like the abstarct objects in Java and other languages. Our want for true abstarct classes is something the Flash player team is well aware of, and we'll likly see it in the next version of the ActionScript language.

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I think this is a place where Flex's/Flash's API is not correct. I think that addChild should take an interface not a class. However since that is not the case you have to cast it. Another option would be to monkey patch UIComponent so that it takes an interface or maybe add another method like addIChild(IUIComponent). But that's messy. So I recommend you file a bug.

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+1 for mentioning a potential bug/flaw in the API: I think many people would shy away from that. It's good to recognize shortcomings in languages, and I think this is one of them (re: Michael's response, and my latest response). –  bedwyr May 9 '09 at 5:31
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Situation here is that it should be just the other way around for optimal practice... you shouldn't look to cast your interface to a displayobject but to have your instance already as a displayobject and then cast that to your interface to apply specific methods.

Let's say I have a baseclass Page and other subclasses Homepage, Contactpage and so on. Now you don't apply stuff to the baseclass as it's kind of abstract but you desing interfaces for your subclasses.

Let's say sub-pages implement for example an interface to deal with init, addedtostage, loader and whatever, and another one that deals with logic, and have eventually the base req to be manageble as displayobjects.

Getting to design the implementation.. one should just use an interface for specialized stuff and extend the subclass from where it mainly belongs to.. now a page has a 'base' meaning to be displayed (design wise.. the 'base'-class is a displayobject) but may require some specialization for which one builds an interface to cover that.

        public class Page extends Sprite{...}
        public interface IPageLoader{ function loadPage():void{}; function initPage():void{}; }
        public class Homepage extends Page implements IPageLoader
        { function loadPage():void{/*do stuff*/}; function initPage():void{/*do stuff*/}; }

        var currentpage:Page;
        var currentpageLoader:IPageLoader;

        currentpage = new Homepage;
        currentpageLoader = currentpage as IPageLoader;

        currentpageLoader.loadPage();
        currentpageLoader.initPage();

        addChild(currentpage);
        Tween(currentpage, x, CENTER);
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