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I have run into some strange behavior. I am not sure if this should work or not. Note that I am not trying to make it work, I am rather concerned with theoretical side. I am using Visual C++ 2010. Observe the following code

template <class T_>
ostream &operator <<(std::ostream &out, 
        typename SequenceCheckResult<T_>::directiontype const &direction) {

    switch(direction) {
    case SequenceCheckResult<T_>::None:
        out<<"none o";
        break;
    case SequenceCheckResult<T_>::Horizontal:
        out<<"horizontal _";
        break;
    case SequenceCheckResult<T_>::Vertical:
        out<<"vertical |";
        break;
    case SequenceCheckResult<T_>::ForwardDiagonal:
        out<<"forward diagonal \\";
        break;
    case SequenceCheckResult<T_>::BackwardDiagonal:
        out<<"backward diagonal /";
        break;
    }

    return out;
}

Obviously the template class SequenceCheckResult contains an enum named directiontype. Now the code above does not get instantiated and integer value of the variable is printed. Even if I provide specialization, it still does not work. If I create the following function, it is used and the textual value is printed. Notice that the following code and int specialization of the above function only differs by template<> line and <int> following operator <<.

ostream &operator << (std::ostream &out, 
         SequenceCheckResult<int>::directiontype const &direction) {

    switch(direction) {
    case SequenceCheckResult<int>::None:
        out<<"none o";
        break;
    case SequenceCheckResult<int>::Horizontal:
        out<<"horizontal _";
        break;
    case SequenceCheckResult<int>::Vertical:
        out<<"vertical |";
        break;
    case SequenceCheckResult<int>::ForwardDiagonal:
        out<<"forward diagonal \\";
        break;
    case SequenceCheckResult<int>::BackwardDiagonal:
        out<<"backward diagonal /";
        break;
    }

    return out;
}

I wish to know why this happens, possible causes are:

  • Compiler bug
  • Implementation defines this behavior
  • Standards define this behavior
  • I am missing something

Thanks in advance

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More code please. Show us how you are calling this. –  jmucchiello Dec 8 '11 at 7:15
    
@jmucchiello: std::cout<<obj.direction; –  Cem Kalyoncu Dec 10 '11 at 12:05

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Your approach does not and cannot work. You cannot deduce a "container based on an element"!

For a simple argument, consider this thought experiment:

struct Foo { typedef int type; }
struct Bar { typedef int type; }

template <typename T> void deduce_me(typename T::type n) { }

Now if I call deduce_me(5), how are we supposed to deduce either Foo or Bar?

share|improve this answer
    
Supplying a constant made it obvious, thx. Original call was cout<<obj.direction –  Cem Kalyoncu Dec 10 '11 at 12:04

SequenceCheckResult<int>::directiontype is a better match for SequenceCheckResult<int>::directiontype than int is (because it's exact), but int is a better match than SequenceCheckResult<_T>::directiontype (because for a given specialization of SequenceCheckResult<_T>, directiontype could still be any type, even though we did at least specify that it's a type with typename).

Edit: and as KerrekSB points out, even if directiontype were somehow known to be int for all _T, that would leave us with no way to determine which _T to use, which causes a problem even though we know it doesn't actually matter which _T is used.

To work around this, define the enum outside the template class. Defining it inside implies that it depends on _T, when it actually doesn't. It may seem convenient for scoping, but the fact that we're writing this operator<< means we can't really fully restrict access anyway. Besides, chances are good that constructors and factory methods would really benefit from outside access to directiontype.

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