Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I've to admit that I'm not really an expert with encoding stuff etc. I've the following problem: my program has to read an text file which contains not only std. ASCII but "special chars and languages" like "..офіціалнов назвов Російска.." So let's assume that this is the content of the file: офіціалнов назвов Російска

Now I'd like to split the whole file content in single words and create another file which list all these words in lines like:

  • офіціалнов
  • назвов
  • Російска

My problem is: if I put these single words into an HashMap and read the values from it -> the encoding is lost. This is my code:

    final StringBuffer fileData = new StringBuffer(1000);
    final BufferedReader reader = new BufferedReader(
            new FileReader("fileIn.txt"));

    char[] buf = new char[1024];
    int numRead = 0;
    while ((numRead = reader.read(buf)) != -1)
    {
        final String readData = String.valueOf(buf, 0, numRead);
        fileData.append(readData);
        buf = new char[1024];
    }
    reader.close();
    String mergedContent = fileData.toString();


    mergedContent = mergedContent.replaceAll("\\<.*?>", " ");
    mergedContent = mergedContent.replaceAll("\\r\\n|\\r|\\n", " ");

    final BufferedWriter out = new BufferedWriter(
            new OutputStreamWriter(
                    new FileOutputStream("fileOut.txt")));

    final HashMap<String, String> wordsMap = new HashMap<String, String>();

    final String test[] = mergedContent.split(" ");


    for (final String string : test)
    {

        wordsMap.put(string, string);
    }

    for (final String string : wordsMap.values())
    {
        out.write(string + "\n");
    }


    out.close();

This snippet destroys the encodig. The funny thing is: if I don't put the values into the HashMap but store them immediately into the output file like:

...
        for (final String string : test)
        {
                        out.write(string + "\n");
            //wordsMap.put(string, string);
        }

        //for (final String string : wordsMap.values())
        //{
        //  out.write(string + "\n");
        //}


        out.close();

...then it works like I expect.

What I'm doing wrong?

share|improve this question
    
It seems extremely unlikely that the HashMap has anything to do with it. In general, you should specify an encoding when creating your FileReaders and OutputStreamWriters. –  Thilo Dec 8 '11 at 7:26
    
Why are you using a HashMap instead of a HashSet? –  user949300 Dec 8 '11 at 7:29
    
FileReader always assumes the default encoding. It's javadoc advises to use InputStreamReader if you don't want that (and you usually don't want it) –  Bozho Dec 8 '11 at 7:29

1 Answer 1

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Try using new InputStreamReader(new FileInputStream(file), "UTF-8") and then the same thing with the output. And make sure your file is encoded in UTF-8

The hashmap can't possibly make anything to the encoding.

share|improve this answer
    
Or, if the file is not UTF-8, specify that encoding to the InputStreamReader. And the same reasoning goes for the OutputStreamWriter. –  Thilo Dec 8 '11 at 7:27
    
I would add that anytime you read a char you need to specify encoding or it will use the default one –  Liviu T. Dec 8 '11 at 7:30
    
Thanks a lot Bozho! THe problem was that the file encoding was UTF-16 ..however, specifing the Inout/OutputStream reader/writer encoding works like a charm –  loteck Dec 8 '11 at 7:30

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.