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How do I use RelativeSource with WPF bindings and what are the different use-cases?

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11 Answers 11

up vote 411 down vote accepted

If you want to bind to another property on the object:

{Binding Path=PathToProperty, RelativeSource={RelativeSource Self}}

If you want to get a property on an ancestor:

{Binding Path=PathToProperty, RelativeSource={RelativeSource AncestorType={x:Type typeOfAncestor}}}

If you want to get a property on the templated parent (so you can do 2 way bindings in a ControlTemplate)

{Binding Path=PathToProperty, RelativeSource={RelativeSource TemplatedParent}}

or, shorter (this only works for OneWay bindings):

{TemplateBinding Path=PathToProperty}
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9  
When you say "bind to another property on the object", which object are you talking about? The display element or the object within the data context? –  Drew Noakes Dec 9 '08 at 17:42
13  
It turns out, as I revisit this, that the object in question is the object upon which the binding is being applied. I tried using <Button Tag="{Binding RelativeSource={RelativeSource Self}}" /> and looking in the debugger. The Tag property contained the button itself. –  Drew Noakes Mar 3 '09 at 9:31
2  
Alternatively you can use {BindTo this.PathToProperty}, {BindTo Ancestor.typeOfAncestor.PathToProperty}, and {BindTo Template.PathToProperty} respectively. By using a library I created specifically to simplify WPF bindings. It also makes it easier to bind buttons to methods. You can find it here: simplygoodcode.com/2012/08/simpler-wpf-binding.html. You can find more details in my answer below. –  luisperezphd Aug 6 '12 at 18:05
Binding RelativeSource={
    RelativeSource Mode=FindAncestor, AncestorType={x:Type ItemType}
}
...

The default attribute of RelativeSource is the Mode property. A complete set of valid values is given here (from MSDN):

  • PreviousData Allows you to bind the previous data item (not that control that contains the data item) in the list of data items being displayed.

  • TemplatedParent Refers to the element to which the template (in which the data-bound element exists) is applied. This is similar to setting a TemplateBindingExtension and is only applicable if the Binding is within a template.

  • Self Refers to the element on which you are setting the binding and allows you to bind one property of that element to another property on the same element.

  • FindAncestor Refers to the ancestor in the parent chain of the data-bound element. You can use this to bind to an ancestor of a specific type or its subclasses. This is the mode you use if you want to specify AncestorType and/or AncestorLevel.

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1  
Thanks for poitning out PreviousData! Exactly what i was looking for! –  Michal Ciechan Sep 16 '10 at 9:14

Here is the cheat-sheet that does help not being confused: http://www.nbdtech.com/Free/WpfBinding.pdf

-aj

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3  
nice overview, thanks for the link! –  David Schmitt Mar 15 '10 at 15:00

Here's a more visual explanation in the context of a MVVM architecture:

enter image description here

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Looks like the link has broken\disappeared somewhere for this? –  Richard Feb 22 '13 at 16:28
    
i didn't have a link ... the image is still there. –  Jeffrey Knight Feb 24 '13 at 1:59
    
Ah, sorry, the image host must be blocked by my company's firewall, my mistake. –  Richard Feb 25 '13 at 8:20
2  
+1 for the graphical representation. –  Mayur Dhingra Feb 10 at 6:48
1  
Read a lot about RelativeSource but never saw something as SIMPLE and CLEAR as this little graphic! Thanks, thanks, thanks. –  SRO Oct 16 at 16:09

Imagine this case, a rectangle that we want that its height is always equal to its width, a square let's say. We can do this using the element name

<Rectangle Fill="Red" Name="rectangle" 
                    Height="100" Stroke="Black" 
                    Canvas.Top="100" Canvas.Left="100"
                    Width="{Binding ElementName=rectangle,
                    Path=Height}"/>

But in this above case we are obliged to indicate the name of the binding object, namely the rectangle. We can reach the same purpose differently using the RelativeSource

<Rectangle Fill="Red" Height="100" 
                   Stroke="Black" 
                   Width="{Binding RelativeSource={RelativeSource Self},
                   Path=Height}"/>

For that case we are not obliged to mention the name of the binding object and the Width will be always equal to the Height whenever the height is changed.

If you want to parameter the Width to be the half of the height then you can do this by adding a converter to the Binding markup extension. Let's imagine another case now:

 <TextBlock Width="{Binding RelativeSource={RelativeSource Self},
                   Path=Parent.ActualWidth}"/>

The above case is used to tie a given property of a given element to one of its direct parent ones as this element holds a property that is called Parent. This leads us to another relative source mode which is the FindAncestor one.

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Thank you for your thoughtful and well written answer. –  David Schmitt Nov 9 '12 at 9:10
    
Its best to cite your source when you copy and paste. –  Jeremy Dec 14 at 3:20

Bechir Bejaoui exposes the use cases of the RelativeSources in WPF in his article here:

The RelativeSource is a markup extension that is used in particular binding cases when we try to bind a property of a given object to another property of the object itself, when we try to bind a property of a object to another one of its relative parents, when binding a dependency property value to a piece of XAML in case of custom control development and finally in case of using a differential of a series of a bound data. All of those situations are expressed as relative source modes. I will expose all of those cases one by one.

  1. Mode Self:

Imagine this case, a rectangle that we want that its height is always equal to its width, a square let's say. We can do this using the element name

<Rectangle Fill="Red" Name="rectangle" 
                Height="100" Stroke="Black" 
                Canvas.Top="100" Canvas.Left="100"
                Width="{Binding ElementName=rectangle,
                Path=Height}"/>

But in this above case we are obliged to indicate the name of the binding object, namely the rectangle. We can reach the same purpose differently using the RelativeSource

<Rectangle Fill="Red" Height="100" 
               Stroke="Black" 
               Width="{Binding RelativeSource={RelativeSource Self},
               Path=Height}"/>

For that case we are not obliged to mention the name of the binding object and the Width will be always equal to the Height whenever the height is changed.

If you want to parameter the Width to be the half of the height then you can do this by adding a converter to the Binding markup extension. Let's imagine another case now:

 <TextBlock Width="{Binding RelativeSource={RelativeSource Self},
               Path=Parent.ActualWidth}"/>

The above case is used to tie a given property of a given element to one of its direct parent ones as this element holds a property that is called Parent. This leads us to another relative source mode which is the FindAncestor one.

  1. Mode FindAncestor

In this case, a property of a given element will be tied to one of its parents, Of Corse. The main difference with the above case is the fact that, it's up to you to determine the ancestor type and the ancestor rank in the hierarchy to tie the property. By the way try to play with this piece of XAML

<Canvas Name="Parent0">
    <Border Name="Parent1"
             Width="{Binding RelativeSource={RelativeSource Self},
             Path=Parent.ActualWidth}"
             Height="{Binding RelativeSource={RelativeSource Self},
             Path=Parent.ActualHeight}">
        <Canvas Name="Parent2">
            <Border Name="Parent3"
            Width="{Binding RelativeSource={RelativeSource Self},
           Path=Parent.ActualWidth}"
           Height="{Binding RelativeSource={RelativeSource Self},
              Path=Parent.ActualHeight}">
               <Canvas Name="Parent4">
               <TextBlock FontSize="16" 
               Margin="5" Text="Display the name of the ancestor"/>
               <TextBlock FontSize="16" 
                 Margin="50" 
            Text="{Binding RelativeSource={RelativeSource  
                       FindAncestor,
                       AncestorType={x:Type Border}, 
                       AncestorLevel=2},Path=Name}" 
                       Width="200"/>
                </Canvas>
            </Border>
        </Canvas>
     </Border>
   </Canvas>

The above situation is of two TextBlock elements those are embedded within a series of borders and canvas elements those represent their hierarchical parents. The second TextBlock will display the name of the given parent at the relative source level.

So try to change AncestorLevel=2 to AncestorLevel=1 and see what happens. Then try to change the type of the ancestor from AncestorType=Border to AncestorType=Canvas and see what's happens.

The displayed text will change according to the Ancestor type and level. Then what's happen if the ancestor level is not suitable to the ancestor type? This is a good question, I know that you're about to ask it. The response is no exceptions will be thrown and nothings will be displayed at the TextBlock level.

  1. TemplatedParent

This mode enables tie a given ControlTemplate property to a property of the control that the ControlTemplate is applied to. To well understand the issue here is an example bellow

<Window.Resources>
<ControlTemplate x:Key="template">
        <Canvas>
            <Canvas.RenderTransform>
                <RotateTransform Angle="20"/>
                </Canvas.RenderTransform>
            <Ellipse Height="100" Width="150" 
                 Fill="{Binding 
            RelativeSource={RelativeSource TemplatedParent},
            Path=Background}">

              </Ellipse>
            <ContentPresenter Margin="35" 
                  Content="{Binding RelativeSource={RelativeSource  
                  TemplatedParent},Path=Content}"/>
        </Canvas>
    </ControlTemplate>
</Window.Resources>
    <Canvas Name="Parent0">
    <Button   Margin="50" 
              Template="{StaticResource template}" Height="0" 
              Canvas.Left="0" Canvas.Top="0" Width="0">
        <TextBlock FontSize="22">Click me</TextBlock>
    </Button>
 </Canvas>

If I want to apply the properties of a given control to its control template then I can use the TemplatedParent mode. There is also a similar one to this markup extension which is the TemplateBinding which is a kind of short hand of the first one, but the TemplateBinding is evaluated at compile time at the contrast of the TemplatedParent which is evaluated just after the first run time. As you can remark in the bellow figure, the background and the content are applied from within the button to the control template.

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Don't forget TemplatedParent:

<Binding RelativeSource="{RelativeSource TemplatedParent}"/>

or

{Binding RelativeSource={RelativeSource TemplatedParent}}
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It's worthy of note that for those stumbling across this thinking of Silverlight:

Silverlight offers a reduced subset only, of these commands

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Yep, I was looking for SL support also. Vote it up: connect.microsoft.com/VisualStudio/feedback/details/480603/… –  TravisWhidden May 18 '10 at 18:31

Since this is top of Google for this problem, I thought I would some useful bits and pieces: here's how to do it mostly in code:

Binding b = new Binding();
b.RelativeSource = new RelativeSource(RelativeSourceMode.FindAncestor,this.GetType(),1);
b.Path = new PropertyPath("MyElementthatNeedsBinding");
MyLable.SetBinding(ContentProperty, b);

I largely copied this from: http://social.msdn.microsoft.com/Forums/en/wpf/thread/c5a59f07-c932-4715-8774-fa7e8472b75b also, the msdn page is pretty good as far as examples go. http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.windows.data.relativesource.aspx

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I just posted another solution for accessing the DataContext of a parent element in Silverlight that works for me. It uses Binding ElementName.

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I created a library to simplify the binding syntax of WPF including making it easier to use RelativeSource. Here are some examples. Before:

{Binding Path=PathToProperty, RelativeSource={RelativeSource Self}}
{Binding Path=PathToProperty, RelativeSource={RelativeSource AncestorType={x:Type typeOfAncestor}}}
{Binding Path=PathToProperty, RelativeSource={RelativeSource TemplatedParent}}
{Binding Path=Text, ElementName=MyTextBox}

After:

{BindTo PathToProperty}
{BindTo Ancestor.typeOfAncestor.PathToProperty}
{BindTo Template.PathToProperty}
{BindTo #MyTextBox.Text}

Here is an example of how method binding is simplified. Before:

// C# code
private ICommand _saveCommand;
public ICommand SaveCommand {
 get {
  if (_saveCommand == null) {
   _saveCommand = new RelayCommand(x => this.SaveObject());
  }
  return _saveCommand;
 }
}

private void SaveObject() {
 // do something
}

// XAML
{Binding Path=SaveCommand}

After:

// C# code
private void SaveObject() {
 // do something
}

// XAML
{BindTo SaveObject()}

You can find the library here: http://www.simplygoodcode.com/2012/08/simpler-wpf-binding.html

Note in the 'BEFORE' example that I use for method binding that code was already optimized by using RelayCommand which last I checked is not a native part of WPF. Without that the 'BEFORE' example would have been even longer.

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I use this library by Luis Perez, it's the best!! –  Salvador Sarpi Dec 19 '12 at 16:13

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