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Was hoping for an explanation as to what it means to pass an exception up the calling chain by declaring the exception in my methods throws clause and why I would want to do that.

Here is an example of my understanding of throwing own exception.

public class ExceptionThrow {
    char[] charArray = new char[] { 'c', 'e', 'a', 'd' };

    void checkArray() throws ABException {
        for (int i = 0; i < charArray.length; i++) {
            switch (charArray[i]) {
            case 'a':
                throw new ABException();
            case 'b':
                throw new ABException();// creating the instance of the
                                        // exception anticipated
            default:
                System.out.println(charArray[i] + " is not A or a B");

            }
        }
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        ExceptionThrow et = new ExceptionThrow();

        try {
            et.checkArray();
        } catch (ABException ab) {
            System.out.println(ab.getMessage() + " An exception did actually occur");
        } finally {
            System.out.println("This block will always execute");
        }

    }
}

class ABException extends Exception {
}

How would I pass the exception 'up the calling chain'?

regards Arian

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3 Answers 3

up vote 10 down vote accepted

The "calling chain", also commonly known as "stack trace", is the list of all nested method calls leading to a single line of execution. In your case, its depth is 2 : main calls checkArray, but there can be dozens of methods.

When an exception occurs in the code, it interrupts the current method and gives the control back to the previous method on the stack trace. If this method can handle the exception (with a catch), the catch will be executed, the exception will stop bubbling up. If not, the exception will bubble up the stack trace. Ultimately, if it arrives in the main and the main cannot handle it, the program will stop with an error.

In your specific case, the throw new ABException() creates and throws an ABException that interrupts the checkArray method. The exception is then caught in your main with catch(ABException ab). So according to your question, you can say that this code passes the exception 'up the calling chain'.

There are many more things to say, notably related to checked/unchecked exceptions. If you have some more specific questions, feel free to ask.

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+1 for the clear explanation. I have one small thing to add, if you would like to see the stacktrace of an exception you can call its printStackTrace() method, e.g. try { ... } catch (Exception e){ e.printStackTrace(); } –  THelper Dec 8 '11 at 8:56

First, you'll have to add throws ABException to the main method and then either delete the block that catches the exception or rethrow it after logging

throw ab;
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You can do it for example by not catching it in main(), but passing it to the piece of logic that called main(). In this case, it's trivial, as main() is your program's entry point...

You could also rewrite your method

void checkArray() throws ABException {
    for (int i = 0; i < charArray.length; i++) {
        check(charArray[i]);
    }
}

void check(char c) throws ABException {
    switch (c) {
        case 'a':
            throw new ABException();
        case 'b':
            throw new ABException();// creating the instance of the
                                    // exception anticipated
        default:
            System.out.println(c + " is not A or a B");
    }
}

Now it becomes more clear how checkArray() "passes the exception from check() up the calling chain"

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WHat if this is a system with multiple components and we don't want to pass the entire stack trace over the wire but bubble up some relevant information? –  user1071840 Jul 18 '13 at 17:36
    
@user1071840: Maybe, ask this in a separate question... –  Lukas Eder Jul 20 '13 at 15:50

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