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I am writing a query to this effect:

select * 
from players 
where player_name like '%K% 
  and player_rank<10 
  and check_if_player_is_eligible(player_name) > 1;

Now, the function check_if_player_is_eligible() is heavy and, therefore, I want the query to filter the search results sufficiently and then only run this function on the filtered results.

How can I ensure that the all filtering happens before the function is executed, so that it runs the minimum number of times ?

share|improve this question
up vote 13 down vote accepted

Here's two methods where you can trick Oracle into not evaluating your function before all the other WHERE clauses have been evaluated:

  1. Using rownum

    Using the pseudo-column rownum in a subquery will force Oracle to "materialize" the subquery. See for example this askTom thread for examples.

    SELECT *
      FROM (SELECT *
               FROM players
              WHERE player_name LIKE '%K%'
                AND player_rank < 10
                AND ROWNUM >= 1)
     WHERE check_if_player_is_eligible(player_name) > 1
    

    Here's the documentation reference "Unnesting of Nested Subqueries":

    The optimizer can unnest most subqueries, with some exceptions. Those exceptions include hierarchical subqueries and subqueries that contain a ROWNUM pseudocolumn, one of the set operators, a nested aggregate function, or a correlated reference to a query block that is not the immediate outer query block of the subquery.

  2. Using CASE

    Using CASE you can force Oracle to only evaluate your function when the other conditions are evaluated to TRUE. Unfortunately it involves duplicating code if you want to make use of the other clauses to use indexes as in:

    SELECT *
      FROM players
     WHERE player_name LIKE '%K%'
       AND player_rank < 10
       AND CASE 
             WHEN player_name LIKE '%K%'
              AND player_rank < 10 
                THEN check_if_player_is_eligible(player_name) 
           END > 1
    
share|improve this answer

There is the NO_PUSH_PRED hint to do it without involving rownum evaluation (that is a good trick anyway) in the process!

SELECT /*+NO_PUSH_PRED(v)*/*
FROM (
        SELECT *
        FROM players
        WHERE player_name LIKE '%K%'
            AND player_rank < 10
    ) v
 WHERE check_if_player_is_eligible(player_name) > 1
share|improve this answer
1  
+1, You could also use the NO_UNNEST hint inside the subquery. – Vincent Malgrat Dec 8 '11 at 9:22

You usually want to avoid forcing a specific order of execution. If the data or the query changes, your hints and tricks may backfire. It's usually better to provide useful metadata to Oracle so it can make the correct decisions for you.

In this case, you can provide better optimizer statistics about the function with ASSOCIATE STATISTICS.

For example, if your function is very slow because it has to read 50 blocks each time it is called:

associate statistics with functions
check_if_player_is_eligible default cost(1000 /*cpu*/, 50 /*IO*/, 0 /*network*/);

By default Oracle assumes that a function will select a row 1/20th of the time. Oracle wants to eliminate as many rows as soon as possible, changing the selectivity should make the function less likely to be executed first:

associate statistics with functions
check_if_player_is_eligible default selectivity 90;

But this raises some other issues. You have to pick a selectivity for ALL possible conditions, 90% certainly won't always be accurate. The IO cost is the number of blocks fetched, but CPU cost is "machine instructions used", what exactly does that mean?

There are more advanced ways to customize statistics,for example using the Oracle Data Cartridge Extensible Optimizer. But data cartridge is probably one of the most difficult Oracle features.

share|improve this answer

You did't specify whether player.player_name is unique or not. One could assume that it is and then the database has to call the function at least once per result record.

But, if player.player_name is not unique, you would want to minimize the calls down to count(distinct player.player_name) times. As (Ask)Tom shows in Oracle Magazine, the scalar subquery cache is an efficient way to do this.

You would have to wrap your function call into a subselect in order to make use of the scalar subquery cache:

SELECT players.*
FROM   players,
      (select check_if_player_is_eligible(player.player_name) eligible) subq
WHERE  player_name LIKE '%K%'
  AND  player_rank < 10
  AND  ROWNUM >= 1
  AND  subq.eligible = 1
share|improve this answer

Put the original query in a derived table then place the additional predicate in the where clause of the derived table.

select * 
from (
   select * 
   from players 
   where player_name like '%K% 
     and player_rank<10 
) derived_tab1
Where  check_if_player_is_eligible(player_name) > 1;
share|improve this answer
1  
@Adrian - That does not force the optimizer to evaluate the function only for the rows that satisfy the other criteria in the inline view. The optimizer is allowed to push the predicate with the function into the inline view. – Justin Cave Dec 8 '11 at 9:02

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