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So this is a small part of a large assignment I have, I'm just unsure of the syntax for this.

I have a Base class named Vehicle, which has these members: int fuelAmt and int fuelUsage)

(note: I am using namespace std)

I overloaded the << operator this way:

ostream& operator<<(ostream& osObject, const Vehicle& myVehicle)
{
cout << "Fuel Usage Rate: " << myVehicle.fuelUsage << endl
     << "Fuel Amount:     " << myVehicle.fuelAmt << endl;

return osObject;
}

I then call it this way:

cout << Vehicle;

The result is (example):

Fuel Usage Rate: 10;
Fuel Amount: 50;

Now I have a class called Airplane which derives from the Vehicle class, it introduces a new member: int numEngines.

How can I overload the << operator in the Airplane class, so that it will first call the "Vehicle overloaded operator results", and then the results of whatever I tell the << operator to print from the derived class... So, here's what I mean:

I need it to function like this in the Airplane class:

ostream& operator<<(ostream& osObject, const Airplane& myAirplane)
{
        //First print the Fuel Usage rate and Fuel amount by calling
        //the Base class overloaded << function

         //then
        cout << "Number of Engines: " << myAirplane.numEngines << endl;

    return osObject;
}

How do I 'trigger' the base class execution of outputting it's members' values, in this derived class?

is it something like changing the header?:

ostream& operator<<(ostream& osObject, const Airplane& myAirplane): operator<<Vehicle
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1  
In operator<< for Vehicle you write to cout. You should write to osObject. –  user763305 Dec 8 '11 at 9:21
1  
Shouldn't Airplane.numEngines in the derived class' operator <<() be myAirplane.numEngines? –  yasouser Dec 8 '11 at 9:26
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3 Answers

up vote 9 down vote accepted

How about something like:

ostream& operator<<(ostream& osObject, const Airplane& myAirplane)
{
    osObject << static_cast<const Vehicle &>(myAirplace);
    obObject << "Number of Engines: " << myAirplane.numEngines << endl;

    return osObject;
}
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you should cast to const vehicle& –  Armen Tsirunyan Dec 8 '11 at 9:23
    
@ArmenTsirunyan: Updated answer with your suggestion –  Joachim Pileborg Dec 8 '11 at 9:24
    
Shouldn't the this in *static_cast<Vehicle *>(this) be replaced with &myAirplane? Likewise instead of Airplane.numEngines shouldn't that be myAirplane.numEngines? –  yasouser Dec 8 '11 at 9:24
    
@yasouser: this? What this? It's a nonmember function! –  Armen Tsirunyan Dec 8 '11 at 9:32
    
This one worked great! Thanks! –  Sergey Dec 8 '11 at 9:55
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Since the operator << is a nonmember function, you can't declare it virtual, which is ideally what you want. So you do the following

class Base
{
public:
    virtual std::ostream& output(std::ostream& out) const
    {
        return out << "Base";
    }
    virtual ~Base() {} //Let's not forget to have destructor virtual
};

class Derived : public Base
{
public:
    virtual std::ostream& output(std::ostream& out) const
    {
        Base::output(out); //<------------------------
        return out << "DerivedPart";
    }
    virtual ~Derived() {} //Let's not forget to have destructor virtual
};

and finally, have operator << for the base class only and the virtual dispatch will work its magic

std::ostream& operator << (std::ostream& out, const Base& b) 
{
    return b.output(out);
}
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ostream& operator<<(ostream& osObject, const Airplane& myAirplane)
{
     //First print the Fuel Usage rate and Fuel amount by calling
     //the Base class overloaded << function
     cout << (Vehicle& ) myAirplane;

     //then
     cout << "Number of Engines: " << myAirplane.numEngines << endl;

     return osObject;
}
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