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As described in Beej's Guide to network Programming, select() monitors a set of file descriptors for reading (using recv()), a set of file descriptor for writing (using send()) and the last one, I don't know. When the server socket receives message from client sockets, read_fds set will be modified and select() return from blocking status. It is the same for sending message to client sockets. For example:

for(;;) {
        read_fds = master; // copy it
        if (select(fdmax+1, &read_fds, NULL, NULL, NULL) == -1) {
            perror("select");
            exit(4);
        }
//the rest is code for processing ready socket

I guess the read_fds set will contain the only ready socket descriptor at this point (the others are removed), and the ready socket descriptor is the new connected socket or message sent from connected socket. Is my understanding correct?

It seems the ready socket must be handled one by one. When I tried to run it on gdb to understand the behavior, while the program was processing the ready socket (the code after select() return), I tried to send some message and connect to the server by some new clients. How can it recognize the new clients or newly sent message, even if select() is not called?

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"even if select() is not called" - why wouldn't you call it? what's your point? –  Karoly Horvath Dec 8 '11 at 10:47
    
@yi_H what I meant is, while stepping through code in GDB, the select() line is not called, but I sent message or tried to connect new clients to the debugging server, which the examiningn code is not on the select() line. –  Amumu Dec 8 '11 at 11:15
    
did you add the listening socket to read_fds? –  Karoly Horvath Dec 8 '11 at 13:02
    
@yi_H sure I did. I just followed Beej's example. –  Amumu Dec 8 '11 at 13:07

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

As described in Beej's Guide to network Programming, select() monitors a set of file descriptors for reading (using recv()), a set of file descriptor for writing (using send())

Yes

and the last one, I don't know.

The last one no longer has any useful meaning.

I guess the read_fds set will contain the only ready socket descriptor at this point (the others are removed), and the ready socket descriptor is the new connected socket or message sent from connected socket. Is my understanding correct?

That's correct.

It seems the ready socket must be handled one by one. When I tried to run it on gdb to understand the behavior, while the program was processing the ready socket (the code after select() return), I tried to send some message and connect to the server by some new clients. How can it recognize the new clients or newly sent message, even if select() is not called?

Normally when you create a polling loop such as this, you'd add new sockets to the loop. That is, you'd add them to the appropriate fd_sets before your next call to select.

When the new socket becomes writable, you'd send on it.

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Thanks. So how about the case with GDB? I connected to the server with a telnet client while the accept() line was passed –  Amumu Dec 8 '11 at 11:45
1  
@Amumu: Your comment makes no sense. –  Matt Joiner Dec 8 '11 at 23:18

When you're dealing with multiple sockets that may potentially block (in your case reading sockets), you need to determine which sockets have data in them waiting to be read. You can do this by calling select() and adding the sockets to your read_set.

For your listening socket, if you call accept() and there is no pending connection, then your accept will block until a new connection arrives. So you also want to select() this socket. Once you accept that client, you will want to add that to your read_set.

e.g. Pseudo-code

for (;;) {
    struct timeval tv = { timeout, 0 };
    fd_set read_set;
    FD_ZERO(&read_set);
    FD_SET(listen_sock, &read_set);
    max_fd = max(max_fd, listen_sock);

    /* add all your other other client sockets to thread read_set */
    n = select(max_fd, &read_set, NULL, NULL, tv);
    if (n > 0) {
        if (FD_ISSET(listen_sock, &read_set)) {
            cli = accept(listen_sock);
            /* add to list of clients */
        }
        else  {
            for (int i = 0; i < max_clients; i++) {
                if (FD_ISSET(clients[i], &read_set)) {
                    /* data is waiting. recv */
                    bytes = recv(clients[i], ..)
                    if (bytes <= 0) {
                        /* error or EOF, remove client list, so we don't select on this anymore */
                    }
                }
            }
        }
    }

Note that sends can also block, if the other end is not actively reading, and the send buffer is full. So if you're sending, you might want to check if it's "sendable".

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Thanks. So how about the case with GDB? I connected to the server with a telnet client while the accept() line was passed. –  Amumu Dec 8 '11 at 11:45
    
Sorry, I don't actually understand your question with GDB. Can you elaborate? –  lloydm Dec 8 '11 at 11:46
    
It means, when the I was examining code with GDB, the line select(...) was stepped through. At that point, there should be no monitoring happened, since select() returned. However, when I tried to connect with a telnet client, it did connect without actually staying at select(...) line or accept(...) line. –  Amumu Dec 8 '11 at 11:53
    
Well, your select has no timeout, so it would return right away. With basically zero. i.e. select timed-out. Nothing ready. As for GDB, TCP will perform SYN/ACK sequence and complete the connection. It is waiting for your user app to call accept. –  lloydm Dec 8 '11 at 11:55
    
I think it would block when timeout is set to NULL? It was actually blocking while I stepped to the line select(). You mean the connection is performed by GDB? I'm so confused. –  Amumu Dec 8 '11 at 11:59

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