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I have a simple question: I have got two functions. Both of them use

if(...) {expression}
if(...) {expression}
if(...) {expression}

instead of

if(...) {expression}
else{
      if(...) {expression}
      else {expression}
}

But only the one of both works.

The first one works perfectly:

test.1 <- function (y) {
 if(y == 1){z <- 10}
 if(y == 2){z <- 20}
 if(y == 5){z <- 50}

 return(z)
}

The second one does not work:

df.1 <- data.frame(A = 1:3)
df.2 <- data.frame(A = 4:6)
df.3 <- data.frame(A = 7:9)

 test.2 <- function (num) {
  x <- with(if(num == 1){df.1} 
            if(num == 2){df.2}
            if(num == 3){df.3}, {sum(A)})
return(x)
}

I need to use the if else expressions in order to get the second function work:

test.2 <- function (num) {
  x <- with(if(num == 1){df.1} 
            else {if(num == 2){df.2}
                  else {df.3}
                  }, {sum(A)})
  return(x)
}

I really do not understand why this multiple if statement work in the first case but not in the second one!??

share|improve this question
    
Did you trie taking the if's out of the x <- with part. So the if's set a variable that you then use in the x <- with part? –  Sander van Knippenberg Dec 8 '11 at 11:09
    
Yes I already tried it. It works but in my real code the with(...) part has 200 lines of code, which means that if I do it this way I get 600 lines of code instead of 200. This is why I would like to insert the if's on the right places inside with(). –  Hagen Brenner Dec 8 '11 at 11:32
    
The fundamental problem is that your second function is not anything resembling proper R syntax. You're essentially asking it for ith(if(num == 1){df.1}if(num == 2){df.2}if(num == 3){df.3}, {sum(A)}) i.e. two arguments to with(), which is just garbage in this context. Use switch instead. if is not designed to return a value anyway, so your data.frames in the {} will print rather than getting assigned to x as far as I can think of. –  Ari B. Friedman Dec 8 '11 at 13:03

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The second example doesn't work because the first argument to with is supposed to be "an environment, a list, a data frame, or an integer as in sys.call" (see the Arguments section ?with).

You can avoid the "unexpected end of line" error by wrapping the if statements in curly brackets:

test.2 <- function (num) {
  x <- with({if(num == 1)df.1 
             if(num == 2)df.2
             if(num == 3)df.3}, {sum(A)})
  return(x)
}

But this still won't work because you have 3 expressions inside the brackets and only the last evaluated expression will be returned. Well, it will work if num==3... but we can do better. You could use switch here instead:

test.2 <- function (num) {
  with(switch(num, df.1, df.2, df.3), sum(A))
}
share|improve this answer

You might be better off using switch:

test.2 <- function(num){
 x <- with(switch(num,df.1,df.2,df.3),{sum(A)})
 return(x)
}


test.2(1)
[1] 6
test.2(2)
[1] 15
test.2(3)
[1] 24
share|improve this answer

Two problems: Firstly, with expects a single expression (that evaulates to a data.frame or environment) in its first argument. You can fix that by wrapping those if statements in curly braces to make it a single expression.

test.2 <- function (num) {
  x <- with(
    {
      if(num == 1){df.1} 
      if(num == 2){df.2}
      if(num == 3){df.3}
    }, 
    sum(A)
  )
  return(x)
}

The second problem is that you aren't returning from the expression after you find a match. So when num is 1, the first if condition is met and the df.1 is returned. But then the next if expression is evaulated, and since num isn't 2, NULL is returned. Similarly, the third if expression returns NULL. Since that is the last expression in the block, that's what gets returned. You effectively have

with(NULL, sum(A))

which is the same as simply sum(A), which throws an error because A doesn't exist.

You could make another fix like

test.2 <- function (num) {
  x <- with(
    {
      if(num == 1)return(df.1) 
      if(num == 2)return(df.2)
      if(num == 3)return(df.3)
    }, 
    sum(A)
  )
  return(x)
}

(this works when num is 1, 2 or 3 ) but you are much better off using switch instead, like James suggests.


If all your data frames are consistently named, as in the example, then there's an even better solution than using switch. Use paste to get the variable name, then call get.

test.3 <- function(num) with(get(paste("df", num, sep = ".")), sum(A))
test.3(1) #6
test.3(2) #15
test.3(3) #24
share|improve this answer

it's possible that all three expressions execute.

if(...) {expression} 
if(...) {expression} 
if(...) {expression} 

In below case, only one expression will execute.

if(...) {expression}  
else
{        
    if(...) {expression}        
    else 
    {
        expression
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
In general you are rigth. This is not the problem though. If you try to run the code I posted above (test.2), you will see that R comes up with an error like "unexpected end of line". –  Hagen Brenner Dec 8 '11 at 11:28
    
Oh .. it's R. it's not my cup of tea at present. –  Azodious Dec 8 '11 at 12:56

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