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simple deadlock example in c#

I've been dealing with multithreading in my apps, and am currently learning about deadlock.

I'd like to write a quick application which actually causes deadlock so that I could observe the effects, and attempt to remedy the situation.

Are there any situation which guarantee deadlock 100% of the time, which I could possibly emulate in C#?

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marked as duplicate by Anders Abel, Henk Holterman, spender, Tudor, Brian Gideon Dec 8 '11 at 14:22

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

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possible dup of stackoverflow.com/questions/2543140/deadlock-sample-in-net –  Matt Dec 8 '11 at 11:47
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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I don't have a ready code for this specific case (:

But what you could do, in psycho-code, is:

thread 1:
take lock 1
sleep 30 sec
take lock 2
free lock 2
free lock 1

thread 2:
take lock 2
sleep 30 sec
take lock 1
free lock 1
free lock 2

each thread can run on it's on, but together they will cause dead-lock is they start more or less at the same time

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Could you kindly suggest a more practical example please? Something which may arise in everyday usage? –  Dot NET Dec 8 '11 at 12:35
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This is the most general scenario. each lock could be used for any kind of shared resource (Database, shared memory and structures etc...). of course the "sleep 30 sec" is use less. this is just to make it more possible to happen. but even without it it's not a safe code. –  Roee Gavirel Dec 8 '11 at 12:45
    
Thanks for the help! –  Dot NET Dec 8 '11 at 12:49

Well, you could simpple construct any deadlock sitution. Imagine Thread A needs a resource (lets say a file) to get some information. Thread be uses the same resource to store some information. B also needs a result from A to store it.

So, using Timers you could start B, let it lock the resource or whatever, try to start A which will wait for B and let B wait for A which wait for B... Thats your deadlock.

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Could you kindly suggest a more practical example please? Something which may arise in everyday usage? –  Dot NET Dec 8 '11 at 12:13

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