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I've noticed this pattern in a lot of Android apps and games recently: when clicking the back button to "exit" the application, a Toast comes up with a message similar to "Please click BACK again to exit".

I was wondering, as I'm seeing it more and more often, is that a built-in feature that you can somehow access in an activity? I've looked at the source code of many classes but I can't seem to find anything about that.

Of course, I can think about a few ways to achieve the same functionality quite easily (the easiest is probably to keep a boolean in the activity that indicates whether the user already clicked once...) but I was wondering if there's something already here.

EDIT: As @LAS_VEGAS mentioned, I didn't really mean "exit" in the traditional meaning. (i.e. terminated) I meant "going back to whatever was open before the application start activity was launched", if that makes sense :)

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[Android - Confirm app exit with toast] [1]: stackoverflow.com/questions/14006461/… –  Ervin Martirosyan Sep 6 '13 at 9:12
    
I had the same problem when using the HoloEverywhere Library, too simply you can add android:launchMode="singleTask" to you activity definition in the manifest file. –  Sohayb Hassoun Sep 11 '13 at 14:44

11 Answers 11

up vote 184 down vote accepted
@Override
public void onBackPressed() {
    if (doubleBackToExitPressedOnce) {
        super.onBackPressed();
        return;
    }

    this.doubleBackToExitPressedOnce = true;
    Toast.makeText(this, "Please click BACK again to exit", Toast.LENGTH_SHORT).show();

    new Handler().postDelayed(new Runnable() {

        @Override
        public void run() {
            doubleBackToExitPressedOnce=false;                       
        }
    }, 2000);
} 

I Think this handler helps to reset the variable after 2 second.

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7  
Best answer! You may also add condition if (doubleBackToExitPressedOnce || fragmentManager.getBackStackEntryCount() != 0) { in case of Fragment-based add –  Anton Derevyanko Dec 12 '12 at 10:47
    
I agree, this is definitely the best answer and should be the accepted answer. –  BruceHill Feb 24 '13 at 18:27
2  
You should remove the Runnable when exit application. –  Wayne Apr 22 '13 at 10:05
    
Check my answer.I have modified the answer given by Sudheesh B Nair to cover the above suggested comments. –  Mehul Joisar Feb 3 at 7:46
5  
It's a nice quick solution/answer but I don't agree that it's the best solution. And for the ones who think this will be best answer again I can't agree. These solution causes leaks and will require extra effort for handling. Check the aswers below for further details. –  Zefnus Apr 27 at 10:57

Just thought I would share how I did it in the end, I just added in my activity:

private boolean doubleBackToExitPressedOnce = false;

@Override
protected void onResume() {
    super.onResume();
    // .... other stuff in my onResume ....
    this.doubleBackToExitPressedOnce = false;
}

@Override
public void onBackPressed() {
    if (doubleBackToExitPressedOnce) {
        super.onBackPressed();
        return;
    }
    this.doubleBackToExitPressedOnce = true;
    Toast.makeText(this, R.string.exit_press_back_twice_message, Toast.LENGTH_SHORT).show();
}

And it just works exactly as I want. Including the reset of the state whenever the activity is resumed.

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4  
With this solution the two back presses can have an arbitrary amount of time between them. So you can press Back once and then press Back again a minute later and the application will exit. This is not the behaviour that the user will expect. –  BruceHill Feb 24 '13 at 18:26
    
I think it's a matter of taste. In this case you notify the user just once, so the user knows he is in the main activity and another back press will exit the app (problably after the user has pressed back a couple of times to go back to the main screen). If, later, the user presses back again, we can suppose he wants to exit the app (unless he has navigated into another activities and problably lost track of how deep he got). In the accepted answer above, you consider that the user might forget that he is already in the main screen. Both are fine, depending on what you want or consider. –  Ferran Maylinch Feb 20 at 12:47

Sudheesh B Nair's has a nice (and accepted) answer on the question, which i think should have a better alternative such as;

What's wrong with measuring time passed and checking if TIME_INTERVAL miliseconds (say 2000) passed since the last back press. The following sample code uses System.currentTimeMillis(); to store the time onBackPressed() is called;

private static final int TIME_INTERVAL = 2000; // # milliseconds, desired time passed between two back presses.
private long mBackPressed;

@Override
public void onBackPressed()
{
    if (mBackPressed + TIME_INTERVAL > System.currentTimeMillis()) 
    { 
        super.onBackPressed(); 
        return;
    }
    else { Toast.makeText(getBaseContext(), "Tap back button in order to exit", Toast.LENGTH_SHORT).show(); }

    mBackPressed = System.currentTimeMillis();
}

Back on accepted answer critique; Using a flag to indicate if it was pressed in last TIME_INTERVAL (say 2000) milliseconds and set - reset is via Handler's postDelayed() method was the first thing to come in my mind. But the postDelayed() action should be cancelled when activity is closing, removing the Runnable.

In order to remove the Runnable, it must not be declared anonymous, and be declared as member along with the Handler aswell. Then removeCallbacks() method of Handler can be called appropriately.

The following sample is the demonstration;

private boolean doubleBackToExitPressedOnce;
private Handler mHandler;

private final Runnable mRunnable = new Runnable() {
    @Override
    public void run() {
        doubleBackToExitPressedOnce = false;                       
    }
};

@Override 
protected void onDestroy() 
{ 
    super.onDestroy();

    if (mHandler != null) { mHandler.removeCallbacks(mRunnable); }
}

@Override
public void onBackPressed() {
    if (doubleBackToExitPressedOnce) {
        super.onBackPressed();
        return;
    }

    this.doubleBackToExitPressedOnce = true;
    Toast.makeText(this, "Please click BACK again to exit", Toast.LENGTH_SHORT).show();

    mHandler.postDelayed(mRunnable, 2000);
}
share|improve this answer
1  
For the ones who think that it's the same what Sudheesh B Nair said: Same functionality, better performance. so +1. –  3yanlis1bos Mar 11 at 17:52
2  
The first code block has the best answer. –  k2s Jun 30 at 16:08
1  
I like this answer and I think it's the best. I mean i don't THINK it is, IT IS the best answer, for the reasons stated above. I hope you get more upvotes for this one. One comment though: no one finds it a it odd that the toast persists a couple of seconds after the app closes? No one cares to cancel the toast? I know it may be a small detail but I think that should happen. What do you guys think? –  acrespo Jul 1 at 21:32
    
@acrespo Thank you. You are right, it looks odd when toast continues to appear after application is terminated. Maybe most of the users don't care because it happens. In Android, toast messages appear in launcher and it is usual. –  Zefnus Jul 2 at 17:06
1  
@joonty thanks for edit, that int keyword has been missing for some time. It will compile now (: –  Zefnus Oct 17 at 6:50

Process Flow Diagram: Press again to exit.

Java Code:

private long lastPressedTime;
private static final int PERIOD = 2000;

@Override
public boolean onKeyDown(int keyCode, KeyEvent event) {
    if (event.getKeyCode() == KeyEvent.KEYCODE_BACK) {
        switch (event.getAction()) {
        case KeyEvent.ACTION_DOWN:
            if (event.getDownTime() - lastPressedTime < PERIOD) {
                finish();
            } else {
                Toast.makeText(getApplicationContext(), "Press again to exit.",
                        Toast.LENGTH_SHORT).show();
                lastPressedTime = event.getEventTime();
            }
            return true;
        }
    }
    return false;
}
share|improve this answer
    
I initally voted this as being helpful. Trouble is, for some reason, this doesn't work on some handsets. The onBackPressed method works best, but then you don't have the timestamps, so you need the handlers as the accepted answer states. –  ravemir Jan 16 '13 at 10:04

It's not a built in functionality. I think it is not even the recommended behavior. Android apps are not meant to exit:

Why dont Android applications provide an "Exit" option?

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Point taken. By exit, I meant "going back to home screen" –  Guillaume Dec 8 '11 at 12:14
3  
Still it is not a built in functionality. However I'm unaware of any guideline against this. As an android user, I like such functionality. –  Caner Dec 8 '11 at 12:26

Based upon the correct answer and suggestions in comments, I have created a demo which works absolutely fine and removes the handler callbacks after being used.

MainActivity.java

package com.mehuljoisar.d_pressbacktwicetoexit;

import android.os.Bundle;
import android.os.Handler;
import android.app.Activity;
import android.widget.Toast;

public class MainActivity extends Activity {

    private static final long delay = 2000L;
    private boolean mRecentlyBackPressed = false;
    private Handler mExitHandler = new Handler();
    private Runnable mExitRunnable = new Runnable() {

        @Override
        public void run() {
            mRecentlyBackPressed=false;   
        }
    };

    @Override
    protected void onCreate(Bundle savedInstanceState) {
        super.onCreate(savedInstanceState);
        setContentView(R.layout.activity_main);
    }

    @Override
    public void onBackPressed() {

        //You may also add condition if (doubleBackToExitPressedOnce || fragmentManager.getBackStackEntryCount() != 0) // in case of Fragment-based add
        if (mRecentlyBackPressed) {
            mExitHandler.removeCallbacks(mExitRunnable);
            mExitHandler = null;
            super.onBackPressed();
        }
        else
        {
            mRecentlyBackPressed = true;
            Toast.makeText(this, "press again to exit", Toast.LENGTH_SHORT).show();
            mExitHandler.postDelayed(mExitRunnable, delay);
        }
    }

}

I hope it will be helpful !!

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I know this is a very old question, but this is the easiest way to do what you want.

@Override
public void onBackPressed() {
   ++k; //initialise k when you first start your activity.
   if(k==1){
      //do whatever you want to do on first click for example:
      Toast.makeText(this, "Press back one more time to exit", Toast.LENGTH_LONG);
   }else{
      //do whatever you want to do on the click after the first for example:
      finish(); 
   }
}

I know this isn't the best method, but it works fine!

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This is not the general behaviour of "clicking back button twice to exit". Like BruceHill's comment on accepted answer points out, your answer doesn't handle time issue too –  inankupeli Apr 21 '13 at 4:10

Zefnus's answer using System.currentTimeMillis() is the best one (+1). The way I did it is not better than that, but still posting it to add to the above ideas.

If the toast is not visible when the back button is pressed, the toast is displayed, whereas, if it is visible (back has already been pressed once within the last Toast.LENGTH_SHORT time), then it exits.

exitToast = Toast.makeText(this, "Press again to exit", Toast.LENGTH_SHORT);
.
.
@Override
public void onBackPressed() {
   if (exitToast.getView().getWindowToken() == null) //if toast is currently not visible
      exitToast.show();  //then show toast saying 'press againt to exit'
   else {                                            //if toast is visible then
      finish();                                      //or super.onBackPressed();
      exitToast.cancel();
   }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Nice alternative Kartik, thank you. –  Zefnus Apr 27 at 10:58
    
Is a good way to do this, but if you have more toast messages is not. –  Paul Dec 11 at 15:05

There is very simplest way among all these answers.

Simply write following code inside onBackPressed() method.

@Override
public void onBackPressed() {
    if (back_pressed + 1000 > System.currentTimeMillis()){
        super.onBackPressed();
    }
    else{
        Toast.makeText(getBaseContext(),
                "Press once again to exit!", Toast.LENGTH_SHORT)
                .show();
    }
    back_pressed = System.currentTimeMillis();
}

You need to define back_pressed object as long in activity.

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Recently, I needed to implement this back button feature in an app of mine. The answers on the original question were useful, but I had to take two more points into consideration:

  1. At some points in time, the back button is disabled
  2. The main activity is using fragments in combination with a back stack

Based on the answers and comments, I created the following code:

private static final long BACK_PRESS_DELAY = 1000;

private boolean mBackPressCancelled = false;
private long mBackPressTimestamp;
private Toast mBackPressToast;

@Override
public void onBackPressed() {
    // Do nothing if the back button is disabled.
    if (!mBackPressCancelled) {
        // Pop fragment if the back stack is not empty.
        if (getSupportFragmentManager().getBackStackEntryCount() > 0) {
            super.onBackPressed();
        } else {
            if (mBackPressToast != null) {
                mBackPressToast.cancel();
            }

            long currentTimestamp = System.currentTimeMillis();

            if (currentTimestamp < mBackPressTimestamp + BACK_PRESS_DELAY) {
                super.onBackPressed();
            } else {
                mBackPressTimestamp = currentTimestamp;

                mBackPressToast = Toast.makeText(this, getString(R.string.warning_exit), Toast.LENGTH_SHORT);
                mBackPressToast.show();
            }
        }
    }
}

The code above assumes that the support library is used. If you use fragments but not the support library, you want to replace getSupportFragmentManager() by getFragmentManager().

Remove the first if, if the back button is never cancelled. Remove the second if, if you don`t use fragments or a fragment back stack

Also, it is important to be aware that the method onBackPressed is supported since Android 2.0. Check this page for an elaborate description. To make the back press feature work on older versions as well, add the following method to your activity:

@Override
public boolean onKeyDown(int keyCode, KeyEvent event)  {
    if (android.os.Build.VERSION.SDK_INT < android.os.Build.VERSION_CODES.ECLAIR
            && keyCode == KeyEvent.KEYCODE_BACK
            && event.getRepeatCount() == 0) {
        // Take care of calling this method on earlier versions of
        // the platform where it doesn't exist.
        onBackPressed();
    }

    return super.onKeyDown(keyCode, event);
}
share|improve this answer
@Override public void onBackPressed() {
   Log.d("CDA", "onBackPressed Called");
   Intent intent = new Intent();
   intent.setAction(Intent.ACTION_MAIN);
   intent.addCategory(Intent.CATEGORY_HOME);

   startActivity(intent);
}
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