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I'm having trouble getting javadoc to reference another project's API.

There's a strict hirearchy between the projects (a "common" project referenced by an "app" project). Both projects build just fine, so there's no issue with classes and packages not actually existing.

My understanding is that javadoc doesn't have a sort of buildpath in the same way that Java does, but uses links to other javadoc websites instead. There's some pretty logical reasons for this in terms of being able to generate HTML cross references.

My attempt to make this goes as follows:

  1. I've built the javadoc for the common project
  2. I threw that on a webserver on my intranet
  3. I added a link to the api (on my intranet) to the javadoc ant task in the app project.
  4. I attempted to build the app project

Javadoc still spits out error messages of the form:

[javadoc] C:\Users\couling\workspace\app\src\com\blahblah\app\AppMain.java:14: package com.blahblah.common.foo does not exist
[javadoc] import com.blahblah.common.foo.Bar
[javadoc]                               ^

The resulting javadoc has no cross links between the projects.

The ant tasks for the two projects are as follows:

Common:

<javadoc 
         access="protected" 
         author="true" 
         classpath="." 
         destdir="out/doc/docs" 
         nodeprecated="false"
         nodeprecatedlist="false" 
         noindex="false" 
         nonavbar="false" 
         notree="false"
         packagenames="*"
         source="1.6" 
         sourcepath="src" 
         splitindex="true" 
         use="true" 
         version="true">
             <link href="http://download.oracle.com/javase/6/docs/api/" />
</javadoc>

App:

<javadoc 
         access="protected" 
         author="true" 
         classpath="." 
         destdir="out/doc/docs" 
         nodeprecated="false"
         nodeprecatedlist="false" 
         noindex="false" 
         nonavbar="false" 
         notree="false"
         packagenames="com.blahblah.app.*"
         source="1.6" 
         sourcepath="src" 
         splitindex="true" 
         use="true" 
         version="true">
             <link href="http://intranet.blahblah.com/api/common/docs/" />
             <link href="http://download.oracle.com/javase/6/docs/api/" />
</javadoc>

Any thoughts on what I need to do to get app to reference common?

share|improve this question
    
Sorry about that. I removed my answer. This seems like an Ant classpath issue. I'm a maven user and have no experience with ant. –  Gray Dec 8 '11 at 13:56
    
Is the Bar class package accessible and therefore not included in the JavaDoc? –  Gandalf Dec 8 '11 at 16:02
    
Bar is part of the common project. It exists in the javadoc for that which (I thought) should be covered by adding the link: intranet.blahblah.com/api/common/docs. I've checked that the respective javadoc page exists under this url. I've even checked the webserver logs to see that the pacakge-list is being accessed and that com.blahblah.common.foo is mentioned in that file. Am I (as far as I've written) going about this the right way? –  couling Dec 8 '11 at 16:29

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The <link> element (or the -link option for command line javadoc) only help with generating the links - but Javadoc stops at an earlier point, it can't really work with your app classes if they reference unknown (common) classes.

In this respect, Javadoc works just like Javac - you must somehow point it to the classes to be used, i.e. they must be in the class path. You can use a <classpath> element to point to the jar file or class directory, or a <sourcepath> element, to point to the sources (do this if you need to inherit some comments from them).

This is not needed for linking to the standard API, since it is already included in the compiler.

Note that linking in this way requires Javadoc to download the package-list from this URL - you can instead point to a local directory which contains this package-list file.

share|improve this answer
    
Thats fixed it. Thanks very much. –  couling Dec 11 '11 at 13:17

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