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I have see strange behaviour with class costructors in Ruby C extension.
See an example: we have a class Foo that is a C extension and a class Bar that inherits from Foo:

extconf.rb

# extconf.rb
require 'mkmf'
create_makefile('foo/foo')

foo.c

// foo.c
#include "ruby.h"
#include <stdio.h>

VALUE
foo_new (VALUE class)
{
  printf ("foo_new\n");
  int *ptr;
  VALUE tdata = Data_Wrap_Struct (class, 0, 0, ptr);
  rb_obj_call_init (tdata, 0, 0);
  return tdata;
}

VALUE
foo_init (VALUE self)
{
  printf ("foo_init\n");
  return self;
}

VALUE
foo_plus_one (VALUE self, VALUE x)
{
  printf ("foo_plus_one\n");
  return INT2FIX (FIX2INT (x) + 1);
}

void
Init_foo ()
{
  VALUE foo = rb_define_class ("Foo", rb_cObject);
  rb_define_singleton_method (foo, "new", foo_new, 0);
  rb_define_method (foo, "initialize", foo_init, 0);
  rb_define_method (foo, "plus_one", foo_plus_one, 1);
}

bar.rb

# bar.rb
require './foo'

class Bar < Foo
end

Ok let's see strange stuffs...
In this situation all go ok:

x = Bar.new

we get the 2 prints: foo_new and foo_init.
Ok good, BUT if we change the class Bar in this way:

# bar.rb
require './foo'

class Bar < Foo
  def initialize(param = 1)
  end
end

we have the first strange stuff if we run

x = Bar.new

we get only 1 print: foo_new. And foo_init ??
Ok, we can bypass this problem adding an explicit call to the constructor of Foo:

# bar.rb
require './foo'

class Bar < Foo
  def initialize(param = 1)
    super()
  end
end

We get the 2 prints: foo_new and foo_init if we call x = Bar.new.

The second strange stuff is this: if we call

x = Bar.new(2)

we get the error

in `new': wrong number of arguments(1 for 0) (ArgumentError)

But the constructor of Bar accept one parameter with default value.
Why this? Is this a Ruby bug?

(tested with ruby1.9.3-p0 [ x86_64 ])

share|improve this question
    
p Bar.new.class prints Foo, right? –  Guilherme Bernal Dec 8 '11 at 13:31
    
Bar.new.class prints Bar, Foo.new.class prints Foo –  Pioz Dec 8 '11 at 13:44

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You defined ::new to take no arguments, so wrong number of arguments(1 for 0) is expected. Anyway, ::new shouldn't be redefined. The right way to do it is defining the ::allocate method (::new calls it internally).

This should work:

// foo.c
#include "ruby.h"
#include <stdio.h>

void foo_free (void *ptr) {
    free (ptr);
}

VALUE foo_alloc (VALUE class) {
    printf ("foo_alloc\n");
    int *ptr = malloc(sizeof(int));
    return Data_Wrap_Struct (class, 0, foo_free, ptr);
}

VALUE foo_init (VALUE self) {
    printf ("foo_init\n");
    return self;
}

void Init_foo (void) {
    VALUE cFoo = rb_define_class ("Foo", rb_cObject);
    rb_define_alloc_func (cFoo, foo_alloc);
    rb_define_method (cFoo, "initialize", foo_init, 0);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Ok, thanks!!! I have follow this doc: ruby-doc.org/docs/ProgrammingRuby/html/ext_ruby.html (see the example)... –  Pioz Dec 8 '11 at 14:11

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