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I am trying to create a generic Identifier class which I would be able to use as follows:

public class TestGenericIdentifier {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Identifier<Car> carId = new Identifier<>(Car.IdentifierType.LICENSE_PLATE, "123 XYZ");
        Identifier<Person> personId = new Identifier<>(Person.IdentifierType.SOCIAL_SECURITY, "123456");
        System.out.println(carId);
        System.out.println(personId);
    }
}

To get there, I started by creating an Identifiable interface:

public interface Identifiable<T extends Enum> {}

The idea being that a class that implements Identifiable needs to provide an enum T in its declaration which is the type of the first parameter of the Identifier constructor:

public class Identifier<E extends Identifiable<T>> { //does not compile
    public Identifier(T type, String value) {
        //some code
    }
}

Now the code above does not compile as I can only use Identifiable (no parameter T) on the first line. If it worked I would be able to write the following two classes:

public class Car implements Identifiable<Car.IdentifierType>{

    public enum IdentifierType {
        SERIAL_NUMBER,
        LICENSE_PLATE;
    }
}

public class Person implements Identifiable<Person.IdentifierType> {

    public enum IdentifierType {
        DATABASE_ID,
        SOCIAL_SECURITY;
    }
}

Is there a way to do that using generics?
EDIT
One way is to compromise conciseness and keep compile-time type checking by doing:

public class Identifier<T extends Enum> {

    public Identifier(T type, String value) {
    }
}

and the main function becomes:

Identifier<Car.IdentifierType> carId = new Identifier<>(Car.IdentifierType.LICENSE_PLATE, "123 XYZ");
Identifier<Person.IdentifierType> personId = new Identifier<>(Person.IdentifierType.SOCIAL_SECURITY, "123456");
share|improve this question
    
I'm wondering why you need Identifier when you already have Identifiable. –  Steven Jeuris Dec 8 '11 at 14:13
    
Basically, an Identifiable is an object that gives you an enum of the types of identifiers. So a Car is identifiable by 2 different types of Identifier: SERIAL_NUMBER and LICENSE_PLATE. –  assylias Dec 8 '11 at 14:55

2 Answers 2

public class Identifier<E extends Identifiable<? extends Enum>> {
    public Identifier(Enum type, String value) {
        //some code
    }
}

Might be enough for what you want

share|improve this answer
    
That would work but there is no type checking and I can then write: Identifier<Car> carId = new Identifier<>(Person.IdentifierType.SOCIAL_SECURITY, "123456"); –  assylias Dec 8 '11 at 14:55
1  
I know. But be careful, you need a balance between type strength enforcement and readability / usability. You can have really complex generics constructs, but it's not always worth it. For example, you can check at runtime that the type is an "allowed one" and throw a RuntimeException if not (IllegalArgumentException?) - I know it's not the same as failing at compile time, but that may be enough –  Guillaume Dec 8 '11 at 15:08

You can get this to compile by tweaking your code a bit but I'm not sure it's what you want. The following seems to work for me.

Identifier<Car.IdentifierType, Car> carId =
    new Identifier<Car.IdentifierType, Car>(Car.IdentifierType.LICENSE_PLATE,
        "123 XYZ");

public static class Identifier<T extends Enum, E extends Identifiable<T>> {
    public Identifier(T type, String value) {
        // some code
    }
}

The question is why do you want to do this? If you edit your question some more with the background, I can edit my answer to be more helpful.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes that would work, but I am trying to make the code less verbose. What I am trying to achieve is to be able in the Identifier class to detect that Car is of type Identifiable<Car.IdentifierType>, and use Car.IdentifierType as a generic type in a method. –  assylias Dec 8 '11 at 14:59
    
Yeah, I'm not sure you can do that with generics. You can do it with runtime instanceof checks in your code of course. Remember that you can certainly have an enum implement an interface if that helps. –  Gray Dec 8 '11 at 15:11

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