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I have this formula in a function below. It's a fairly simple concept, yet this formula took me almost 2 weeks to get perfect. What it does is calculates what point to place an object at a given degree around and distance from a central point. It's useful for manually drawing circles, and also I primarily use it for a needle gauge component of mine. It calculates where to draw the needle.

Now I'm trying to figure out how to modify this formula to take ovals or ellipses into account. I did think of the idea of drawing a component a round shape first, and then stretching it after everything's drawn, but this is not a clean solution, as the drawing which I'm doing will already be in the shape of an oval.

I need to add just one parameter to this function to tell it the ratio between the width/height so it knows how to off-set this point. By default, this parameter should be 1, meaning Width=Height, meaning no ovalish drawing or offset. But suppose I put 2, which means width is twice the size of the height, or 1.5 would mean the width is 1.5 times the height.

Here's the original function:

function NewPosition(Center: TPoint; Distance: Integer; Degrees: Single): TPoint;
var
  Radians: Real;
begin
  //Convert angle from degrees to radians; Subtract 135 to bring position to 0 Degrees
  Radians:= (Degrees - 135) * Pi / 180;
  Result.X:= Trunc(Distance*Cos(Radians)-Distance*Sin(Radians))+Center.X;
  Result.Y:= Trunc(Distance*Sin(Radians)+Distance*Cos(Radians))+Center.Y;
end;

Here it is with the added parameter I need:

function NewPosition(Center: TPoint; Distance: Integer; Degrees: Single;
  OvalOffset: Single = 1): TPoint;
var
  Radians: Real;
begin
  //Convert angle from degrees to radians; Subtract 135 to bring position to 0 Degrees
  Radians:= (Degrees - 135) * Pi / 180;
  Result.X:= Trunc(Distance*Cos(Radians)-Distance*Sin(Radians))+Center.X;
  Result.Y:= Trunc(Distance*Sin(Radians)+Distance*Cos(Radians))+Center.Y;
end;

DEFINITIONS:

  • Center = Central point where to base calculations from (center of ellipse)
  • Distance = How far from Center in any direction, regardless of Degrees
  • Degrees = How many degrees around central point, starting from up-right
  • OvalOffset = Ratio of difference between Width and Height

enter image description here

share|improve this question
    
Are the ellipse axes of symmetry horizontal and vertical? –  David Heffernan Dec 8 '11 at 15:47
    
Yes, I don't care about rotation of the oval, just width differing from height. –  Jerry Dodge Dec 8 '11 at 15:54
    
Just to clarify: the result from NewPosition shall have the given Distance from the center and be on the angle given by Degrees? At least that is what I read from your DEFINITIONS. –  Uwe Raabe Dec 8 '11 at 16:35
    
Exactly. I already have this working, no more help needed, unless you want to do something even fancier with it? Such as, add ability to rotate this oval to a certain degree? Not important though, thanks. –  Jerry Dodge Dec 8 '11 at 16:37
    
In that case your question is somewhat unclear. Given a fixed distance and varying degrees to the function, most of the resulting points will have a different distance to the center as specified. For an elliptic curve the values for Distance and Degree usually don't match the measured distance and degree of each point. –  Uwe Raabe Dec 8 '11 at 16:47

1 Answer 1

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Add a division by OvalOffset to just the Result.Y formula...

Result.Y:= Trunc((Distance*Sin(Radians)+Distance*Cos(Radians))/OvalOffset)
           +Center.Y;
share|improve this answer
    
Perhaps I got it wrong, but with your code won't the distance between Result and Center be different to the given value Distance? –  Uwe Raabe Dec 8 '11 at 16:13
    
Distance = how far away from center regardless of degrees, Degrees = degrees around center point starting from up-right –  Jerry Dodge Dec 8 '11 at 16:22
    
And yes I tried your formula and instead of making an oval, it made just a smaller circle (I used exact formula on Result.X too) –  Jerry Dodge Dec 8 '11 at 16:23
    
@Jerry How could a linear scaling of the Y offset result in a circle? –  David Heffernan Dec 8 '11 at 16:25
    
Ah ha, I misunderstood the answer because it wasn't thoroughly explained. I tried to copy this formula over to Result.X as well, which resulted in just a smaller circle. Changed Result.X back to original code, and it works now :D –  Jerry Dodge Dec 8 '11 at 16:27

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