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I currently have a function that takes a csv file, and returns an array of the data from it. I want to minimally alter this function to take the file data instead of the file itself.

Using the following code, I would like to get a resource handle from the passed in data, instead of from a file so that I can keep the rest of the function the same. Is this possible?

public function returnRawCSVData($filepath, $separator = ',')
{
    $file = fopen($filepath, 'r');
    $csvrawdata = array();

    //I WANT TO CHANGE $filepath to $file_data and get a resource from it to pass into fgetcsv below.

    while( ($row = fgetcsv($file,  $this->max_row_size, $separator, $this->enclosure)) != false ) {            
        if( $row[0] != null ) { // skip empty lines

        }
    }

    fclose($file);
    return $csvrawdata;
}
share|improve this question
    
Am I understanding correctly that you are simply looking to make your returnRawCSVData() function accept an already open file resource handle as an argument? Or are you trying to generate a resource from the csv source text you want to pass into returnRawCSVData()? –  rdlowrey Dec 8 '11 at 16:55
    
@rdlowrey The second one –  Metropolis Dec 8 '11 at 17:20

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

It seems you're looking for a way to create a new file resource from the source text?

If so, you can create a file resource in-memory like so:

/**
 * Return an in-memory file resource handle from source text
 * @param string $csvtxt CSV source text
 * @return resource File resource handle
 */
public static function getFileResourceFromSrcTxt($csvtxt)
{
  $tmp_handle = fopen('php://temp', 'r+');
  fwrite($tmp_handle, $csvtxt);
  return $tmp_handle;
}

/**
 * Parse csv data from source text
 * @param $file_data CSV source text
 * @see self::getFileResourceFromSrcTxt
 */
public function returnRawCSVData($file_data, $separator = ',')
{
  $file = self::getFileResourceFromSrcTxt($file_data);
  $csvrawdata = array();

  while( ($row = fgetcsv($file,  $this->max_row_size, $separator, $this->enclosure)) != false ) {            
    if( $row[0] != null ) { // skip empty lines
      // do stuff
    }
  }

  fclose($file);
}

It's worth noting that you can also use "php://memory" in place of "php://temp" -- the difference being that 'memory' ONLY stores things in memory while 'temp' will store something in memory until it reaches a given size (the default is 2 MB), then transparently switch to the filesystem.

Find out more about what the php docs say on this topic ...

share|improve this answer
    
So this is basically like taking the file data, creating a temp file, and getting the handle to it right? That was the other way I had thought about doing it, but was trying to avoid any kind of file creation. But your solution is better since its made to be temporary. –  Metropolis Dec 8 '11 at 17:17
    
Right -- you never touch the filesystem doing it this way. It's a much cleaner way to deal with temp data than putting it on disk then deleting it. –  rdlowrey Dec 8 '11 at 17:22
    
Awesome, thanks a lot! –  Metropolis Dec 8 '11 at 17:23
    
If you have 1000 people using this function, do you think it would more or less resource intensive than just creating a real file, inserting the data, and getting the handle? –  Metropolis Dec 8 '11 at 20:28
    
Well doing it in memory will certainly be much faster than writing to the filesystem. If you have enough RAM and the source data isn't enormous I wouldn't expect problems. Even if that's not the case, however, that's where the behavior of php://temp is really fantastic -- if you run out of memory it will switch transparently to storing the resource on the file system. So, no, the amount of load shouldn't dissuade you from using this solution over an actual filesystem handle. I would read that link to the php docs on the topic for more info. –  rdlowrey Dec 8 '11 at 21:14

If you're trying to pass around file handles, you can treat them as such:

$in_file = fopen('some_file.csv', 'r');
// Do stuff with input...

// Later, pass the file handle to a function and let it read from the file too.
$data = doStuffWithFile($in_file);

fclose($in_file);


function doStuffWithFile($file_handle)
{
    $line = fgetcsv($file_handle);
    return $line;
}
share|improve this answer
    
I have the data from the file, so I can not pass a handle. Thats what the original function does. –  Metropolis Dec 8 '11 at 17:31

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