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Trying to use hmatrix, to create a zero marix. For some reason, when I try this on command line, it works:

buildMatrix 2 3 (\(r,c) -> fromIntegral 0)

However, when I try to do the same thing in my code:

type Dim = (Int, Int)

buildFull :: Matrix Double -> Vector Int -> Vector Int -> Dim -> Int
buildFull matrix basic nonbasic (m, n) = do
    -- Build mxn matrix of zeroes
    let f = buildMatrix m n (\(r,c) -> fromIntegral 0)
    m

it fails:

Pivot.hs:23:17:
    Ambiguous type variable `a0' in the constraints:
      (Element a0) arising from a use of `buildMatrix'
                   at Pivot.hs:23:17-27
      (Num a0) arising from a use of `fromIntegral' at Pivot.hs:23:44-55
    Probable fix: add a type signature that fixes these type variable(s)
    In the expression: buildMatrix m n (\ (r, c) -> fromIntegral 0)
    In an equation for `f':
        f = buildMatrix m n (\ (r, c) -> fromIntegral 0)
    In the expression:
      do { let f = buildMatrix m n (\ (r, c) -> ...);
           m }
Failed, modules loaded: none.
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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted
type Dim = (Int, Int)

buildFull :: Matrix Double -> Vector Int -> Vector Int -> Dim -> Int
buildFull matrix basic nonbasic (m, n) = do
    -- Build mxn matrix of zeroes
    let f = buildMatrix m n (\(r,c) -> fromIntegral 0)
    m

First, to use do-notation, you need a monadic return type, so that won't compile even after fixing the ambiguous element type (as I was reminded by @Carl, it would be okay here while there's only a single expression so that no (>>=) or (>>) is needed).

Concerning the element type, in the let-binding, there is no way to find out which type to use, whether fromIntegral should return Double, Integer or whatever. Often the type to be used can be inferred from context, by the expressions it is used in. Here, f is nowhere used, so there's no context. Hence in this situation, you have to specify the type by a signature, that can be

let f :: Matrix Double
    f = buildMatrix m n (const 0)

or

let f = buildMatrix m n (\_ -> (0 :: Double))

if you want the element type o be Double.

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1  
It's not strictly true you need a monadic result type to use do notation. In fact, do notation introduces no constraints on the form of the expression it results, except that they be well-typed after the desugaring process. And since that will just desugar to "let ... in ...", and not involve the >>= or >> operators in any way, that case doesn't need a monadic return type. –  Carl Dec 8 '11 at 17:33
    
Hm.. i'm getting the Illegal signature in pattern: Matrix -> Double f Use -XScopedTypeVariables to permit it error if I do the first approach. –  drozzy Dec 8 '11 at 17:37
    
Also let f = buildMatrix m n 0::Double doesn't seem to work: "Couldn't match expected type (Int, Int) -> a0' with actual type Double' In the third argument of buildMatrix', namely (0 :: Double)' In the expression: buildMatrix m n (0 :: Double) In an equation for `f': f = buildMatrix m n (0 :: Double) Failed, modules loaded: none." –  drozzy Dec 8 '11 at 17:38
    
@Carl Oh, right, I always forget that it's fine with single expressions of any type :( –  Daniel Fischer Dec 8 '11 at 17:40
    
@drozzy Oops, that must be a function, and not a number, fixed now. For the first, check the indentation. And there's no -> between Matrix and Double there. –  Daniel Fischer Dec 8 '11 at 17:43

You can also use konst from Numeric.Container:

import Numeric.LinearAlgebra

m = konst 0 (2,3) :: Matrix Double

v = konst 7 10 :: Vector (Complex Float)
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Replace fromIntegral 0 with 0::Double. Otherwise the sort of matrix you want to build is underconstrained. At the prompt, extended defaulting rules are probably solving that problem for you.

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